Homework help

Necessity of online homework help.

Contemporary world is a scene for competitions. Starting at early childhood environment immerse us into struggle for best positions. With constant population growth it becomes harder to get a place in kindergartens, schools for gifted children, prestigious universities and, of course, you are not alone in desire to have a well-paid job. Children since early age know that they must study hard, devote themselves into different subjects, and be successful and active in post-school projects. Under pressure of numerous complex tasks no wonder they often require homework help. For their needs special websites were launched. And now every child can get guidance and online homework help from every corner of the world. With opportunity to ask questions about necessary subjects he will at his own pace learn information. This also adds more individuality to process of studying, as children might experience problems with concentrated and fast group-learning. Online homework help is not merely a way to make grades better and to finish all tasks in time, it's personal attention and support. Websites offer plenty of subjects to work at, but according to searches most popular (as it's complicated to understand) is math homework help. This subject is a nightmare for both schoolchildren and their parents.

Why using college homework help is beneficial

It might come as surprise for graduates but when you enter college or university, amount of homework will be only increasing. Yes, besides lectures and practical courses you are obliged to do some homework too. And it might be incredibly more complicated than all things you have done in school. Plenty of students are struggling to cope with amount of tasks themselves but some are looking for websites for college homework help. With current subjects, with unknown teachers, with new classrooms it's stressful enough for young people to be focused. That's why students choose homework help discord, a place to discuss all difficulties online and solve problems. With guidance and support of experts it's easier to understand unknown topics and work on self-improvement. It's recommended not to torture yourself and get accounting homework help or any other kind of assistance. With wide range of professionals you can find a person no matter how complicated your task is.

Is it safe to trust strangers with important tasks?

Looking for online help with college or school tasks you might doubt reliability of person who is assisting you from other side of screen. How is it possible to find a proper tutor for difficult statistics homework help? Read reviews, study information, ask for certificates or diplomas to be assured you hire a true expert to perform job

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The Pros and Cons of Homework

The-Pros-and-Cons-Should-Students-Have-Homework

Homework is a word that most students dread hearing. After hours upon hours of sitting in class , the last thing we want is more schoolwork over our precious weekends. While it’s known to be a staple of traditional schooling, homework has also become a rather divise topic. Some feel as though homework is a necessary part of school, while others believe that the time could be better invested. Should students have homework? Have a closer look into the arguments on both sides to decide for yourself.

A college student completely swamped with homework.

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Why should students have homework, 1. homework encourages practice.

Many people believe that one of the positive effects of homework is that it encourages the discipline of practice. While it may be time consuming and boring compared to other activities, repetition is needed to get better at skills. Homework helps make concepts more clear, and gives students more opportunities when starting their career .

2. Homework Gets Parents Involved

Homework can be something that gets parents involved in their children’s lives if the environment is a healthy one. A parent helping their child with homework makes them take part in their academic success, and allows for the parent to keep up with what the child is doing in school. It can also be a chance to connect together.

3. Homework Teaches Time Management

Homework is much more than just completing the assigned tasks. Homework can develop time management skills , forcing students to plan their time and make sure that all of their homework assignments are done on time. By learning to manage their time, students also practice their problem-solving skills and independent thinking. One of the positive effects of homework is that it forces decision making and compromises to be made.

4. Homework Opens A Bridge Of Communication

Homework creates a connection between the student, the teacher, the school, and the parents. It allows everyone to get to know each other better, and parents can see where their children are struggling. In the same sense, parents can also see where their children are excelling. Homework in turn can allow for a better, more targeted educational plan for the student.

5. Homework Allows For More Learning Time

Homework allows for more time to complete the learning process. School hours are not always enough time for students to really understand core concepts, and homework can counter the effects of time shortages, benefiting students in the long run, even if they can’t see it in the moment.

6. Homework Reduces Screen Time

Many students in North America spend far too many hours watching TV. If they weren’t in school, these numbers would likely increase even more. Although homework is usually undesired, it encourages better study habits and discourages spending time in front of the TV. Homework can be seen as another extracurricular activity, and many families already invest a lot of time and money in different clubs and lessons to fill up their children’s extra time. Just like extracurricular activities, homework can be fit into one’s schedule.

A female student who doesn’t want to do homework.

The Other Side: Why Homework Is Bad

1. homework encourages a sedentary lifestyle.

Should students have homework? Well, that depends on where you stand. There are arguments both for the advantages and the disadvantages of homework.

While classroom time is important, playground time is just as important. If children are given too much homework, they won’t have enough playtime, which can impact their social development and learning. Studies have found that those who get more play get better grades in school , as it can help them pay closer attention in the classroom.

Children are already sitting long hours in the classroom, and homework assignments only add to these hours. Sedentary lifestyles can be dangerous and can cause health problems such as obesity. Homework takes away from time that could be spent investing in physical activity.

2. Homework Isn’t Healthy In Every Home

While many people that think homes are a beneficial environment for children to learn, not all homes provide a healthy environment, and there may be very little investment from parents. Some parents do not provide any kind of support or homework help, and even if they would like to, due to personal barriers, they sometimes cannot. Homework can create friction between children and their parents, which is one of the reasons why homework is bad .

3. Homework Adds To An Already Full-Time Job

School is already a full-time job for students, as they generally spend over 6 hours each day in class. Students also often have extracurricular activities such as sports, music, or art that are just as important as their traditional courses. Adding on extra hours to all of these demands is a lot for children to manage, and prevents students from having extra time to themselves for a variety of creative endeavors. Homework prevents self discovery and having the time to learn new skills outside of the school system. This is one of the main disadvantages of homework.

4. Homework Has Not Been Proven To Provide Results

Endless surveys have found that homework creates a negative attitude towards school, and homework has not been found to be linked to a higher level of academic success.

The positive effects of homework have not been backed up enough. While homework may help some students improve in specific subjects, if they have outside help there is no real proof that homework makes for improvements.

It can be a challenge to really enforce the completion of homework, and students can still get decent grades without doing their homework. Extra school time does not necessarily mean better grades — quality must always come before quantity.

Accurate practice when it comes to homework simply isn’t reliable. Homework could even cause opposite effects if misunderstood, especially since the reliance is placed on the student and their parents — one of the major reasons as to why homework is bad. Many students would rather cheat in class to avoid doing their homework at home, and children often just copy off of each other or from what they read on the internet.

5. Homework Assignments Are Overdone

The general agreement is that students should not be given more than 10 minutes a day per grade level. What this means is that a first grader should be given a maximum of 10 minutes of homework, while a second grader receives 20 minutes, etc. Many students are given a lot more homework than the recommended amount, however.

On average, college students spend as much as 3 hours per night on homework . By giving too much homework, it can increase stress levels and lead to burn out. This in turn provides an opposite effect when it comes to academic success.

The pros and cons of homework are both valid, and it seems as though the question of ‘‘should students have homework?’ is not a simple, straightforward one. Parents and teachers often are found to be clashing heads, while the student is left in the middle without much say.

It’s important to understand all the advantages and disadvantages of homework, taking both perspectives into conversation to find a common ground. At the end of the day, everyone’s goal is the success of the student.

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20 Pros and Cons of Homework

Homework. It’s a word that sends a shudder down the spine of students and parents alike.

It is also a question that has become divisive. Some people feel that homework is an effective way to reinforce the concepts that were learned at school. Others feel like the time that homework demands would be better spent with a meaningful activity that brings the family together.

Is homework important? Is it necessary? Or is the added stress that homework places on students and parents doing more harm than good? Here are some of the key pros and cons to discuss.

List of the Pros of Homework

1. It encourages the discipline of practice. Repeating the same problems over and over can be boring and difficult, but it also reinforces the practice of discipline. To get better at a skill, repetition is often necessary. You get better with each repetition. By having homework completed every night, especially with a difficult subject, the concepts become easier to understand. That gives the student an advantage later on in life when seeking a vocational career.

2. It gets parents involved with a child’s life. Looking at Common Core math can be somewhat bewildering to parents. If you see the math problem 5×3 expressed as an addition problem, 5+5+5 seems like the right answer. The correct answer, however, would be 3+3+3+3+3. By bringing homework to do, students can engage their learning process with their parents so everyone can be involved. Many parents actually want homework sent so they can see what their children are being taught in the classroom.

3. It teaches time management skills. Homework goes beyond completing a task. It forces children (and parents, to some extent) to develop time management skills. Schedules must be organized to ensure that all tasks can be completed during the day. This creates independent thinking and develops problem-solving skills. It encourages research skills. It also puts parents and children into a position where positive decision-making skills must be developed.

4. Homework creates a communication network. Teachers rarely see into the family lives of their students. Parents rarely see the classroom lives of their children. Homework is a bridge that opens lines of communication between the school, the teacher, and the parent. This allows everyone to get to know one another better. It helps teachers understand the needs of their students better.

It allows parents to find out their child’s strengths and weaknesses. Together, an educational plan can be developed that encourages the best possible learning environment.

5. It allows for a comfortable place to study. Classrooms have evolved over the years to be a warmer and welcoming environment, but there is nothing like the comfort that is felt at home or in a safe space. By encouraging studies where a child feels the most comfortable, it is possible to retain additional information that may get lost within the standard classroom environment.

6. It provides more time to complete the learning process. The time allotted for each area of study in school, especially in K-12, is often limited to 1 hour or less per day. That is not always enough time for students to be able to grasp core concepts of that material. By creating specific homework assignments which address these deficiencies, it becomes possible to counter the effects of the time shortages. That can benefit students greatly over time.

7. It reduces screen time. On the average school night, a student in the US might get 3-4 hours of screen time in per day. When that student isn’t in school, that figure doubles to 7-8 hours of screen time. Homework might be unwanted and disliked, but it does encourage better study habits. It discourages time being spent in front of the television or playing games on a mobile device. That, in turn, may discourage distracting habits from forming that can take away from the learning process in the future.

8. It can be treated like any other extracurricular activity. Some families over-extend themselves on extracurricular activities. Students can easily have more than 40 hours per week, from clubs to sports, that fall outside of regular school hours. Homework can be treated as one of these activities, fitting into the schedule where there is extra time. As an added benefit, some homework can even be completed on the way to or from some activities.

List of the Cons of Homework

1. Children benefit from playing. Being in a classroom can be a good thing, but so can being on a playground. With too much homework, a child doesn’t have enough time to play and that can impact their learning and social development. Low levels of play are associated with lower academic achievement levels, lower safety awareness, less character development, and lower overall health.

2. It encourages a sedentary lifestyle. Long homework assignments require long periods of sitting. A sedentary lifestyle has numerous direct associations with premature death as children age into adults. Obesity levels are already at or near record highs in many communities. Homework may reinforce certain skills and encourage knowledge retention, but it may come at a high price.

3. Not every home is a beneficial environment. There are some homes that are highly invested into their children. Parents may be involved in every stage of homework or there may be access to tutors that can explain difficult concepts. In other homes, there may be little or no education investment into the child. Some parents push the responsibility of teaching off on the teacher and provide no homework support at all.

Sometimes parents may wish to be involved and support their child, but there are barriers in place that prevent this from happening. The bottom line is this: no every home life is equal.

4. School is already a full-time job for kids. An elementary school day might start at 9:00am and end at 3:20pm. That’s more than 6 hours of work that kids as young as 5 are putting into their education every day. Add in the extra-curricular activities that schools encourage, such as sports, musicals, and after-school programming and a student can easily reach 8 hours of education in the average day. Then add homework on top of that? It is asking a lot for any child, but especially young children, to complete extra homework.

5. There is no evidence that homework creates improvements. Survey after survey has found that the only thing that homework does is create a negative attitude toward schooling and education in general. Homework is not associated with a higher level of academic achievement on a national scale. It may help some students who struggle with certain subjects, if they have access to a knowledgeable tutor or parent, but on a community level, there is no evidence that shows improvements are gained.

6. It discourages creative endeavors. If a student is spending 1 hour each day on homework, that’s an hour they are not spending pursuing something that is important to them. Students might like to play video games or watch TV, but homework takes time away from learning an instrument, painting, or developing photography skills as well. Although some homework can involve creative skills, that usually isn’t the case.

7. Homework is difficult to enforce. Some students just don’t care about homework. They can achieve adequate grades without doing it, so they choose not to do it. There is no level of motivation that a parent or teacher can create that inspires some students to get involved with homework. There is no denying the fact that homework requires a certain amount of effort. Sometimes a child just doesn’t want to put in that effort.

8. Extra time in school does not equate to better grades. Students in the US spend more than 100 hours of extra time in school already compared to high-performing countries around the world, but that has not closed the educational gap between those countries and the United States. In some educational areas, the US is even falling in global rankings despite the extra time that students are spending in school. When it comes to homework or any other form of learning, quality is much more important than quantity.

9. Accurate practice may not be possible. If homework is assigned, there is a reliance on the student, their parents, or their guardians to locate resources that can help them understand the content. Homework is often about practice, but if the core concepts of that information are not understood or inaccurately understood, then the results are the opposite of what is intended. If inaccurate practice is performed, it becomes necessary for the teacher to first correct the issue and then reteach it, which prolongs the learning process.

10. It may encourage cheating on multiple levels. Some students may decide that cheating in the classroom to avoid taking homework home is a compromise they’re willing to make. With internet resources, finding the answers to homework instead of figuring out the answers on one’s own is a constant temptation as well. For families with multiple children, they may decide to copy off one another to minimize the time investment.

11. Too much homework is often assigned to students. There is a general agreement that students should be assigned no more than 10 minutes of homework per day, per grade level. That means a first grader should not be assigned more than 10 minutes of homework per night. Yet for the average first grader in US public schools, they come home with 20 minutes of homework and then are asked to complete 20 minutes of reading on top of that. That means some students are completing 4x more homework than recommended every night.

At the same time, the amount of time children spent playing outdoors has decreased by 40% over the past 30 years.

For high school students, it is even worse at high performing schools in the US where 90% of graduates go onto college, the average amount of homework assigned per night was 3 hours per student.

12. Homework is often geared toward benchmarks. Homework is often assigned to improve test scores. Although this can provide positive outcomes, including better study skills or habits, the fact is that when children are tired, they do not absorb much information. When children have more homework than recommended, test scores actually go down. Stress levels go up. Burnout on the curriculum occurs.

The results for many students, according to research from Ruben Fernandez-Alonso in the Journal of Educational Psychology, is a decrease in grades instead of an increase.

The pros and cons of homework are admittedly all over the map. Many parents and teachers follow their personal perspectives and create learning environments around them. When parents and teachers clash on homework, the student is often left in the middle of that tug of war. By discussing these key points, each side can work to find some common ground so our children can benefit for a clear, precise message.

Quantity may be important, but quality must be the priority for homework if a student is going to be successful.

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18 Advantages and Disadvantages of Homework Should Be Banned

Homework has been a part of the schooling experience for multiple generations. There are some lessons that are perfect for the classroom environment, but there are also some things that children can learn better at home. As a general rule, the maximum amount of time that a student should spend each day on lessons outside of school is 10 minutes per each grade level.

That means a first grader should spend about 10 minutes each night on homework. If you are a senior in high school, then the maximum limit would be two hours. For some students, that might still be too much extra time doing work. There are some calls to limit the amount of time spent on extra limits to 30 minutes per day at all of the older K-12 grades – and some are saying that homework should be banned outright.

Can teachers get all of the lessons taught in an appropriate way during the 1-2 hours per subject that they might get each day? Do parents have an opportunity to review what their children learn at school if none of the work ever gets brought back home?

There are several advantages and disadvantages of why homework should be banned from the current school structure.

List of the Advantages of Why Homework Should Be Banned

1. Homework creates a longer day for students than what parents work. There are times when parents need to bring work home with them after a long day of productivity, but this time is usually part of a compensation package. Students do not receive the same luxury. After spending 6-8 hours at school, there might be two more hours of homework to complete before getting through all of the assignments that are due. That means some kids are putting in a longer working day than their parents. This disadvantage means there are fewer moments for going outside, spending time with friends, or pursuing a hobby.

2. There is no guarantee of an improved academic outcome. Research studies provide conflicting results when looking at the impact of homework on a student’s life. Younger students may benefit from a complete ban so that they can separate their home and classroom experiences. Even older students who perform projects outside of the school benefit from time restrictions on this responsibility. Design flaws exist on both sides of the clinical work that looks at this topic, so there is no definitive scientific conclusion that points to a specific result. It may be better to err on the side of caution.

3. Homework restrictions reduce issues with classroom burnout for students. Homework stress is a significant problem in the modern classroom for K-12 students. Even kids in grade school are finding it a challenge to maintain their performance because of the pressure that daily assignments cause. About 1 in 4 teachers in North America say that there are direct adverse impacts that happen because of the amount of learning required of students today. It can also cause older students to drop out of school because they can’t stay caught up on the work that they need to do.

When students have a chance to have time to pursue interests outside of the classroom, then it can create healthier learning opportunities in the future for them.

4. Banning homework would give families more time to spend together. One in three American households with children say that the homework assignments that teachers give are the primary source of stress in their home. When kids must complete their work by a specific deadline, then there is less time for families to do activities together. Instead of scheduling their time around their free hours, they must balance homework requirements in their plans. There are even fewer moments for parents to be involved in the learning process because of the specific instructions that students must follow to stay in compliance with the assignment.

5. Student health is adversely impacted by too many homework assignments. Kids of any age struggle academically when they do not have opportunities to finish their homework by a specific deadline. It is not unusual for school administrators and some teachers to judge children based on their ability to turn work in on time. If a child has a robust work ethic and still cannot complete the work, the negative approach that they might encounter in the classroom could cause them to abandon their learning goals.

This issue can even lead to the development of mental health problems. It can reduce a child’s self-esteem, prevent them from learning essential learning skills, and disrupt their ability to learn new skills in other areas of life outside of the classroom. Even the risk of self-harm and suicide increase because of excessive homework. That’s why banning it could be a healthy choice for some people.

6. Banning homework would help students get more sleep. Teens need up to 10 hours of sleep each night to maximize their productivity. Students in grade school can need up to 12 hours nightly as well. When homework assignments are necessary and time consuming, then this issue can eat into the amount of rest that kids get each night. Every assignment given to a K-12 student increases their risks of losing at least one hour of sleep per night. This issue can eventually lead to sleep deficits that can create chronic learning issues. It may even lead to problems with emotional control, obesity, and attention problems. Banning homework would remove the issue entirely.

7. It would encourage dynamic learning opportunities. There are some homework projects that students find to be engaging, such as a science fair project or another hands-on assignment. Many of the tasks that students must complete for their teachers involves repetition instead. You might see grade school students coming home with math sheets with 100 or more problems for them to solve. Reading assignments are common at all grades. Instead of learning the “why” behind the information they learn, the goal with homework is usually closer to memorization that it is to self-discovery. That’s why it can be challenging to retain the data that homework provides.

8. Banning homework would provide more time for peer socialization. Students who are only spending time in school before going home to do homework for the rest of the evening are at a higher risk of experiencing isolation and loneliness. When these sentiments are present in the life of a child, then they are more likely to experience physical and mental health concerns that lead to shyness and avoidance.

These students lack essential connections with other people because of their need to complete homework. The adverse impact on the well being of a child is the equivalent of smoking more than a pack of cigarettes each day. If kids are spending time all of their time on homework, then they are not connecting with their family and friends.

9. Some students do not have a home environment that’s conducive to homework. Although some kids can do their homework in a tranquil room without distress, that is not the case for most children. Numerous events happen at home that can shift a child’s attention away from the homework that their teacher wants them to complete. It isn’t just the TV, video games, and the Internet which are problematic either. Family problems, chores, an after-school job, and team sports can make it problematic to get the assignments finished on time.

Banning homework equalizes the playing field because teachers can control the classroom environment. They do not have control over when, where, or how their students complete assignments away from school.

10. It would eliminate the assignment of irrelevant work. Homework can be a useful tool when teachers use it in targeted ways. There are times when these assignments are handed out for the sake of giving out busy work. If the content of the work is irrelevant to the lessons in the classroom, then it should not be handed out. It is unreasonable to expect that a student can generate excellent grades on work that is barely covered in the classroom.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development reports that given students just four hours of take-home assignments per week has a detrimental impact on individual productivity. The average U.S. high school already pushes that limit by offering 3.5 hours of extra assignments per week.

List of the Disadvantages of Why Homework Should Be Banned

1. Teachers can see if students understand the materials being taught. Homework allows a teacher to determine if a student has a grasp on the materials being taught in the classroom. Tests and school-based activities can provide this information as well, but not in the same way. If the data sticks outside of the educational setting, then this is an excellent indication that the process was effective for that individual. If there are gaps in knowledge that occur in the homework, then the learning process can become individualized to ensure the best possible results for each child.

2. Homework can reduce the stress and anxiety of test-taking. Students often study for tests at home to ensure that they can pass with an acceptable grade. Walking into a classroom only prepared with the notes and memories of previous lessons can create high levels of fear that could impact that child’s final result. Banning homework could place more pressure on kids to succeed than what they currently experience today. This disadvantage would also create more labels in the classroom based on the performance of each child in unfair ways. Some students excel in a lecture-based environment, but others do better at home where there are fewer distractions.

3. Assignments can be an effective way to discover learning disabilities. Kids do an excellent job of hiding their struggles in the classroom from adults. They use their disguises as a coping mechanism to help them blend in when they feel different. That behavior can make it a challenge to identify students who many benefit from a different learning approach in specific subjects. By assigning homework to each child periodically, there are more opportunities to identify the issues that can hold some people back. Then the teachers can work with the families to develop alternative learning plans that can make the educational process better for each student because individual assignments eliminate the ability to hide.

4. Parents are more involved in the learning process because of homework. Parents need to know what their children are learning in school. Even if they ask their kids about what they are learning, the answers tend to be given in generalities. Without specific examples from the classroom, it is challenging to stay involved in a student’s educational process.

By sending homework from the school, it allows the entire family to encounter the assignments that their kids are doing when they are in school during the day. Then there is more adult involvement with the learning process, reinforcing the core ideas that were discovered by their kids each day.

5. Homework provides opportunities for students to use deeper research. The average classroom in the United States provides less than 60 minutes of instruction for each subject daily. Generalist teachers in grade school might skip certain subjects on some days as well. When there are homework assignments going home, then it creates more chances to use the tools at home to learn more about what is happening at school. Taking a deeper look at specific subjects or lessons through independent study can lead to new thoughts or ideas that may not occur in the classroom environment. This process can eventually lead to a better understanding of the material.

6. The homework process requires time management and persistence to be successful. Students must learn core life skills as part of the educational process. Time management skills are one of the most useful tools that can be in a child’s life toolbox. When you know how to complete work by a deadline consistently, then this skill can translate to an eventual career. Homework can also teach students how to solve complex problems, understand current events, or tap into what they are passionate about in life. By learning from an early age that there are jobs that we sometimes need to do even if we don’t want to them, the persistence lessons can translate into real successes later in life.

7. Assignments make students accountable for their role in the educational process. Teachers cannot force a student to learn anything. There must be a desire present in the child to know more for information retention to occur. An education can dramatically improve the life of a child in multiple ways. It can lead to more income opportunities, a greater understanding of the world, and how to establish a healthy routine. By offering homework to students, teachers are encouraging today’s kids how to be accountable for their role in their own education. It creates opportunities to demonstrate responsibility by proving that the work can be done on time and to a specific quality.

8. It creates opportunities to practice time management. There can be problems with homework for some students when they are heavily involved in extra-curricular activities. If you give a child two hours of homework after school and they have two hours of commitments to manage at the same time, then there are some significant challenges to their time management to solve. Time really is a finite commodity. If we are unable to manage it in wise ways, then our productivity levels are going to be limited in multiple ways. Creating a calendar with every responsibility and commitment helps kids and their families figure out ways to manage everything while pushing the learning process forward.

Verdict of the Advantages and Disadvantages of Banning Homework

Some students thrive on the homework they receive from their teachers each day. There are also some kids that struggle to complete even basic assignments on time because of their home environment. How can we find a balance between the two extremes so that every child can receive the best possible chance to succeed?

One solution is to ban homework entirely. Although taking this action would require teachers and parents to be proactive in their communication, it could help to equalize the educational opportunities in the classroom.

Until more research occurs in this area, the advantages and disadvantages of banning homework are subjective. If you feel that your child would benefit from a reduced workload, then speak with the teacher to see if this is an option. For teens and older students, there is always the option to pursue a different form of education, such as a vocational school or an apprenticeship, if the traditional classroom doesn’t seem to be working.

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9+ Pros And Cons Of Homework You Must Know (2023)

Nowadays homework is an important part of the education system and has been used for many years to help students practice and solidify concepts. 

Teachers also use this to measure students’ understanding and progress. Many students like homework because it helps them to develop their critical thinking skills. It also helps them to develop good study habits and to learn how to manage their time effectively. 

It is also a good way for teachers to measure student understanding of the material and identify areas where students may need additional support.

But, there are also some disadvantages of homework. For example, some students may find it difficult to complete homework due to a lack of resources, time, or support at home. 

This can lead to stress, frustration, and even poor academic performance. So, in this blog, I will know some pros and cons of homework so, let’s have a look at some pros and cons of homework.

Pros of Homework

Table of Contents

Homework Encourages Practice

Homework Encourages Practice

Homework always leads to practice. Because when you do your homework, you automatically practice what you have learned during your class sessions. Homework is a boring activity as well as time-consuming activity. 

But it is the repetition activity that helps you to get good command over a certain skill. It helps you to clear the concepts more easily. 

When the student solves the equations or answers the question by writing it down on paper or typing it into the computer, the student gets a better chance of getting good command over the concepts given in the homework.

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Homework Gets Parents Involved

Homework Gets Parents Involved

Nowadays, students don’t have enough time to get connected with their parents. But homework helps to bridge the gap between the students and their parents. 

In most of the homework, the students need to take help from their parents, especially in elementary school students. 

It creates a healthy environment for the students to finish their homework with the help of their parents. 

If the parents help the students, then the students get more chances of academic success. 

Homework Teaches Time Management

Homework Teaches Time Management

Time management is quite important for the students’ life. Because the students need to accomplish plenty of tasks within a single day, that is why the students have better time management to help the students accomplish all the tasks within the given deadline. 

If the students get plenty of homework to be accomplished within the same deadline, it teaches them and helps them develop their time management skills. 

In this way, the students prioritize the task and do all their homework on time. Apart from that, it also helps the students to develop problem-solving skills. 

Some of the students also turn into independent thinkers all because of homework. 

Homework Opens A Bridge Of Communication

Homework Opens A Bridge Of Communication

Homework works a lot better when it comes to bridging the communication gap between the students, the teachers, the fellow students, and the parents. 

With the help of homework, the students get to know more about their teacher by asking them for help. 

They come to know about their classmates as well as the school also comes to know where their students are facing problems with homework. 

And what topic excites the students towards studies. In this way, the school can examine the students’ performance and create a study plan for the students.

It Provides More Learning Process.

It Provides More Learning Process.

Students are not learning a single subject in a day. That is the reason the students get only a few hours or minutes to study a particular subject. 

That is why the study doesn’t get enough time to learn the topic of the subject effectively. Especially elementary school students get less than an hour to study the subject daily. 

Therefore they struggle with a lack of time to get good command over the concepts. Homework is one of the best solutions to this problem. 

The homework contains almost everything that the students learned in their classrooms. 

So that the students can clear their concepts while doing their homework. It offers the best learning process to the students.

Cons Of Homework

Speaking directly to the point if you are a student or a person who believes the cons of homework are bigger than the pros just fill the online homework services form and chat with an expert without wasting valuable time.

Eliminate Children Benefit From Playing.

Eliminate Children Benefit From Playing.

The study is good for the mental development of the students. But what about physical development? 

The students need to play on the playground for their physical development. If the students get too much homework, they get out of time playing on the playground. 

It affects the physical as well as social development of the students. 

Lower physical development also leads to lower academics performance, lower social skills, lower safety awareness, less character development, and lots more.

No Evidence Of Improvements By Homework

No Evidence Of Improvements By Homework

It has not been proven that homework is beneficial for students. There are lots of surveys conducted to determine the impact of the homework on the students. 

But all the time, the results indicate the negative impact of homework on the students. Homework doesn’t work at a high level of achievement on the national scale. 

It only helps those students who are facing problems with the concepts of a particular subject. 

But if the students already have good command over the subject, then homework is just a time waste for them.

It Discourages Creativity

It Discourages Creativity

Creativity needs time, and patience. But if the students spend all their time finishing their homework every day. 

Then how can the students be creative enough to explore and learn something new? We have already mentioned that if the students already have a good command over the subject, then the homework is a waste of time. 

It means that the students are spending their time doing the things that won’t work for them. 

The students may not be able to develop their hobby of painting, photography, learning musical instruments, etc. because of the homework.

It May Encourage Cheating On Multiple Levels.

It May Encourage Cheating On Multiple Levels.

The professor or the teacher gives the homework to the students to do it without cheating and try to solve the question on their own which helps the students clear the concepts of the homework. 

But most of the students try to finish their homework within their classroom with the help of copy and paste with their classmates or over the internet resources instead of solving the question with their efforts. 

Because they don’t want to do their homework at home, apart from that, the students also help the intelligent guy do their homework within the classroom. Thus the homework turns the students into a cheater

Beyond The Parent’s Knowledge.

Beyond The Parent’s Knowledge.

The syllabus of the schools and colleges changes according to the changes in technology and trends. 

That is the reason the school and colleges upgrade their syllabus and rules of homework. 

Therefore the parents are not able to take part in finishing their child’s homework. 

They know the different rules as compared with the latest rules enforced by the schools. 

If the parents are not able to help their children, then the students also lose their confidence in their parents. 

In this way, homework also ruins the child’s and parents’ relationship.

We would also like to say that the pros and cons of homework also depend on the students’ perspective. 

Some students might not get satisfied with the pros and cons of a homework list. But some might get satisfied. 

It depends on you whether you enjoy the homework or find it a useless task. 

If you need any homework writing help service with any subject. 

Then our experts are here to provide you a 360-degree solution to your problem.

Was homework ever a punishment?

Roberto Nevilis invented the concept of homework in 1905. But his purpose was to be used as a punishment for students who were lazy in class.

Why do students dislike homework?

Because they think that homework should only be used as additional practice for students who need it.

Is homework harmful or hurtful?

Well, it’s true that homework can help students connect to their learning and improve their in-class performance. But if they get too much homework in their classes, then it can have damaging effects.

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Are You Down With or Done With Homework?

  • Posted January 17, 2012
  • By Lory Hough

Sign: Are you down with or done with homework?

The debate over how much schoolwork students should be doing at home has flared again, with one side saying it's too much, the other side saying in our competitive world, it's just not enough.

It was a move that doesn't happen very often in American public schools: The principal got rid of homework.

This past September, Stephanie Brant, principal of Gaithersburg Elementary School in Gaithersburg, Md., decided that instead of teachers sending kids home with math worksheets and spelling flash cards, students would instead go home and read. Every day for 30 minutes, more if they had time or the inclination, with parents or on their own.

"I knew this would be a big shift for my community," she says. But she also strongly believed it was a necessary one. Twenty-first-century learners, especially those in elementary school, need to think critically and understand their own learning — not spend night after night doing rote homework drills.

Brant's move may not be common, but she isn't alone in her questioning. The value of doing schoolwork at home has gone in and out of fashion in the United States among educators, policymakers, the media, and, more recently, parents. As far back as the late 1800s, with the rise of the Progressive Era, doctors such as Joseph Mayer Rice began pushing for a limit on what he called "mechanical homework," saying it caused childhood nervous conditions and eyestrain. Around that time, the then-influential Ladies Home Journal began publishing a series of anti-homework articles, stating that five hours of brain work a day was "the most we should ask of our children," and that homework was an intrusion on family life. In response, states like California passed laws abolishing homework for students under a certain age.

But, as is often the case with education, the tide eventually turned. After the Russians launched the Sputnik satellite in 1957, a space race emerged, and, writes Brian Gill in the journal Theory Into Practice, "The homework problem was reconceived as part of a national crisis; the U.S. was losing the Cold War because Russian children were smarter." Many earlier laws limiting homework were abolished, and the longterm trend toward less homework came to an end.

The debate re-emerged a decade later when parents of the late '60s and '70s argued that children should be free to play and explore — similar anti-homework wellness arguments echoed nearly a century earlier. By the early-1980s, however, the pendulum swung again with the publication of A Nation at Risk , which blamed poor education for a "rising tide of mediocrity." Students needed to work harder, the report said, and one way to do this was more homework.

For the most part, this pro-homework sentiment is still going strong today, in part because of mandatory testing and continued economic concerns about the nation's competitiveness. Many believe that today's students are falling behind their peers in places like Korea and Finland and are paying more attention to Angry Birds than to ancient Babylonia.

But there are also a growing number of Stephanie Brants out there, educators and parents who believe that students are stressed and missing out on valuable family time. Students, they say, particularly younger students who have seen a rise in the amount of take-home work and already put in a six- to nine-hour "work" day, need less, not more homework.

Who is right? Are students not working hard enough or is homework not working for them? Here's where the story gets a little tricky: It depends on whom you ask and what research you're looking at. As Cathy Vatterott, the author of Rethinking Homework , points out, "Homework has generated enough research so that a study can be found to support almost any position, as long as conflicting studies are ignored." Alfie Kohn, author of The Homework Myth and a strong believer in eliminating all homework, writes that, "The fact that there isn't anything close to unanimity among experts belies the widespread assumption that homework helps." At best, he says, homework shows only an association, not a causal relationship, with academic achievement. In other words, it's hard to tease out how homework is really affecting test scores and grades. Did one teacher give better homework than another? Was one teacher more effective in the classroom? Do certain students test better or just try harder?

"It is difficult to separate where the effect of classroom teaching ends," Vatterott writes, "and the effect of homework begins."

Putting research aside, however, much of the current debate over homework is focused less on how homework affects academic achievement and more on time. Parents in particular have been saying that the amount of time children spend in school, especially with afterschool programs, combined with the amount of homework given — as early as kindergarten — is leaving students with little time to run around, eat dinner with their families, or even get enough sleep.

Certainly, for some parents, homework is a way to stay connected to their children's learning. But for others, homework creates a tug-of-war between parents and children, says Liz Goodenough, M.A.T.'71, creator of a documentary called Where Do the Children Play?

"Ideally homework should be about taking something home, spending a few curious and interesting moments in which children might engage with parents, and then getting that project back to school — an organizational triumph," she says. "A nag-free activity could engage family time: Ask a parent about his or her own childhood. Interview siblings."

Illustration by Jessica Esch

Instead, as the authors of The Case Against Homework write, "Homework overload is turning many of us into the types of parents we never wanted to be: nags, bribers, and taskmasters."

Leslie Butchko saw it happen a few years ago when her son started sixth grade in the Santa Monica-Malibu (Calif.) United School District. She remembers him getting two to four hours of homework a night, plus weekend and vacation projects. He was overwhelmed and struggled to finish assignments, especially on nights when he also had an extracurricular activity.

"Ultimately, we felt compelled to have Bobby quit karate — he's a black belt — to allow more time for homework," she says. And then, with all of their attention focused on Bobby's homework, she and her husband started sending their youngest to his room so that Bobby could focus. "One day, my younger son gave us 15-minute coupons as a present for us to use to send him to play in the back room. … It was then that we realized there had to be something wrong with the amount of homework we were facing."

Butchko joined forces with another mother who was having similar struggles and ultimately helped get the homework policy in her district changed, limiting homework on weekends and holidays, setting time guidelines for daily homework, and broadening the definition of homework to include projects and studying for tests. As she told the school board at one meeting when the policy was first being discussed, "In closing, I just want to say that I had more free time at Harvard Law School than my son has in middle school, and that is not in the best interests of our children."

One barrier that Butchko had to overcome initially was convincing many teachers and parents that more homework doesn't necessarily equal rigor.

"Most of the parents that were against the homework policy felt that students need a large quantity of homework to prepare them for the rigorous AP classes in high school and to get them into Harvard," she says.

Stephanie Conklin, Ed.M.'06, sees this at Another Course to College, the Boston pilot school where she teaches math. "When a student is not completing [his or her] homework, parents usually are frustrated by this and agree with me that homework is an important part of their child's learning," she says.

As Timothy Jarman, Ed.M.'10, a ninth-grade English teacher at Eugene Ashley High School in Wilmington, N.C., says, "Parents think it is strange when their children are not assigned a substantial amount of homework."

That's because, writes Vatterott, in her chapter, "The Cult(ure) of Homework," the concept of homework "has become so engrained in U.S. culture that the word homework is part of the common vernacular."

These days, nightly homework is a given in American schools, writes Kohn.

"Homework isn't limited to those occasions when it seems appropriate and important. Most teachers and administrators aren't saying, 'It may be useful to do this particular project at home,'" he writes. "Rather, the point of departure seems to be, 'We've decided ahead of time that children will have to do something every night (or several times a week). … This commitment to the idea of homework in the abstract is accepted by the overwhelming majority of schools — public and private, elementary and secondary."

Brant had to confront this when she cut homework at Gaithersburg Elementary.

"A lot of my parents have this idea that homework is part of life. This is what I had to do when I was young," she says, and so, too, will our kids. "So I had to shift their thinking." She did this slowly, first by asking her teachers last year to really think about what they were sending home. And this year, in addition to forming a parent advisory group around the issue, she also holds events to answer questions.

Still, not everyone is convinced that homework as a given is a bad thing. "Any pursuit of excellence, be it in sports, the arts, or academics, requires hard work. That our culture finds it okay for kids to spend hours a day in a sport but not equal time on academics is part of the problem," wrote one pro-homework parent on the blog for the documentary Race to Nowhere , which looks at the stress American students are under. "Homework has always been an issue for parents and children. It is now and it was 20 years ago. I think when people decide to have children that it is their responsibility to educate them," wrote another.

And part of educating them, some believe, is helping them develop skills they will eventually need in adulthood. "Homework can help students develop study skills that will be of value even after they leave school," reads a publication on the U.S. Department of Education website called Homework Tips for Parents. "It can teach them that learning takes place anywhere, not just in the classroom. … It can foster positive character traits such as independence and responsibility. Homework can teach children how to manage time."

Annie Brown, Ed.M.'01, feels this is particularly critical at less affluent schools like the ones she has worked at in Boston, Cambridge, Mass., and Los Angeles as a literacy coach.

"It feels important that my students do homework because they will ultimately be competing for college placement and jobs with students who have done homework and have developed a work ethic," she says. "Also it will get them ready for independently taking responsibility for their learning, which will need to happen for them to go to college."

The problem with this thinking, writes Vatterott, is that homework becomes a way to practice being a worker.

"Which begs the question," she writes. "Is our job as educators to produce learners or workers?"

Slate magazine editor Emily Bazelon, in a piece about homework, says this makes no sense for younger kids.

"Why should we think that practicing homework in first grade will make you better at doing it in middle school?" she writes. "Doesn't the opposite seem equally plausible: that it's counterproductive to ask children to sit down and work at night before they're developmentally ready because you'll just make them tired and cross?"

Kohn writes in the American School Board Journal that this "premature exposure" to practices like homework (and sit-and-listen lessons and tests) "are clearly a bad match for younger children and of questionable value at any age." He calls it BGUTI: Better Get Used to It. "The logic here is that we have to prepare you for the bad things that are going to be done to you later … by doing them to you now."

According to a recent University of Michigan study, daily homework for six- to eight-year-olds increased on average from about 8 minutes in 1981 to 22 minutes in 2003. A review of research by Duke University Professor Harris Cooper found that for elementary school students, "the average correlation between time spent on homework and achievement … hovered around zero."

So should homework be eliminated? Of course not, say many Ed School graduates who are teaching. Not only would students not have time for essays and long projects, but also teachers would not be able to get all students to grade level or to cover critical material, says Brett Pangburn, Ed.M.'06, a sixth-grade English teacher at Excel Academy Charter School in Boston. Still, he says, homework has to be relevant.

"Kids need to practice the skills being taught in class, especially where, like the kids I teach at Excel, they are behind and need to catch up," he says. "Our results at Excel have demonstrated that kids can catch up and view themselves as in control of their academic futures, but this requires hard work, and homework is a part of it."

Ed School Professor Howard Gardner basically agrees.

"America and Americans lurch between too little homework in many of our schools to an excess of homework in our most competitive environments — Li'l Abner vs. Tiger Mother," he says. "Neither approach makes sense. Homework should build on what happens in class, consolidating skills and helping students to answer new questions."

So how can schools come to a happy medium, a way that allows teachers to cover everything they need while not overwhelming students? Conklin says she often gives online math assignments that act as labs and students have two or three days to complete them, including some in-class time. Students at Pangburn's school have a 50-minute silent period during regular school hours where homework can be started, and where teachers pull individual or small groups of students aside for tutoring, often on that night's homework. Afterschool homework clubs can help.

Some schools and districts have adapted time limits rather than nix homework completely, with the 10-minute per grade rule being the standard — 10 minutes a night for first-graders, 30 minutes for third-graders, and so on. (This remedy, however, is often met with mixed results since not all students work at the same pace.) Other schools offer an extended day that allows teachers to cover more material in school, in turn requiring fewer take-home assignments. And for others, like Stephanie Brant's elementary school in Maryland, more reading with a few targeted project assignments has been the answer.

"The routine of reading is so much more important than the routine of homework," she says. "Let's have kids reflect. You can still have the routine and you can still have your workspace, but now it's for reading. I often say to parents, if we can put a man on the moon, we can put a man or woman on Mars and that person is now a second-grader. We don't know what skills that person will need. At the end of the day, we have to feel confident that we're giving them something they can use on Mars."

Read a January 2014 update.

Homework Policy Still Going Strong

Illustration by Jessica Esch

Ed. Magazine

The magazine of the Harvard Graduate School of Education

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Stanford research shows pitfalls of homework

A Stanford researcher found that students in high-achieving communities who spend too much time on homework experience more stress, physical health problems, a lack of balance and even alienation from society. More than two hours of homework a night may be counterproductive, according to the study.

Denise Pope

Education scholar Denise Pope has found that too much homework has negative effects on student well-being and behavioral engagement. (Image credit: L.A. Cicero)

A Stanford researcher found that too much homework can negatively affect kids, especially their lives away from school, where family, friends and activities matter.

“Our findings on the effects of homework challenge the traditional assumption that homework is inherently good,” wrote Denise Pope , a senior lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Education and a co-author of a study published in the Journal of Experimental Education .

The researchers used survey data to examine perceptions about homework, student well-being and behavioral engagement in a sample of 4,317 students from 10 high-performing high schools in upper-middle-class California communities. Along with the survey data, Pope and her colleagues used open-ended answers to explore the students’ views on homework.

Median household income exceeded $90,000 in these communities, and 93 percent of the students went on to college, either two-year or four-year.

Students in these schools average about 3.1 hours of homework each night.

“The findings address how current homework practices in privileged, high-performing schools sustain students’ advantage in competitive climates yet hinder learning, full engagement and well-being,” Pope wrote.

Pope and her colleagues found that too much homework can diminish its effectiveness and even be counterproductive. They cite prior research indicating that homework benefits plateau at about two hours per night, and that 90 minutes to two and a half hours is optimal for high school.

Their study found that too much homework is associated with:

• Greater stress: 56 percent of the students considered homework a primary source of stress, according to the survey data. Forty-three percent viewed tests as a primary stressor, while 33 percent put the pressure to get good grades in that category. Less than 1 percent of the students said homework was not a stressor.

• Reductions in health: In their open-ended answers, many students said their homework load led to sleep deprivation and other health problems. The researchers asked students whether they experienced health issues such as headaches, exhaustion, sleep deprivation, weight loss and stomach problems.

• Less time for friends, family and extracurricular pursuits: Both the survey data and student responses indicate that spending too much time on homework meant that students were “not meeting their developmental needs or cultivating other critical life skills,” according to the researchers. Students were more likely to drop activities, not see friends or family, and not pursue hobbies they enjoy.

A balancing act

The results offer empirical evidence that many students struggle to find balance between homework, extracurricular activities and social time, the researchers said. Many students felt forced or obligated to choose homework over developing other talents or skills.

Also, there was no relationship between the time spent on homework and how much the student enjoyed it. The research quoted students as saying they often do homework they see as “pointless” or “mindless” in order to keep their grades up.

“This kind of busy work, by its very nature, discourages learning and instead promotes doing homework simply to get points,” Pope said.

She said the research calls into question the value of assigning large amounts of homework in high-performing schools. Homework should not be simply assigned as a routine practice, she said.

“Rather, any homework assigned should have a purpose and benefit, and it should be designed to cultivate learning and development,” wrote Pope.

High-performing paradox

In places where students attend high-performing schools, too much homework can reduce their time to foster skills in the area of personal responsibility, the researchers concluded. “Young people are spending more time alone,” they wrote, “which means less time for family and fewer opportunities to engage in their communities.”

Student perspectives

The researchers say that while their open-ended or “self-reporting” methodology to gauge student concerns about homework may have limitations – some might regard it as an opportunity for “typical adolescent complaining” – it was important to learn firsthand what the students believe.

The paper was co-authored by Mollie Galloway from Lewis and Clark College and Jerusha Conner from Villanova University.

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Student Opinion

Should We Get Rid of Homework?

Some educators are pushing to get rid of homework. Would that be a good thing?

cons of no homework

By Jeremy Engle and Michael Gonchar

Do you like doing homework? Do you think it has benefited you educationally?

Has homework ever helped you practice a difficult skill — in math, for example — until you mastered it? Has it helped you learn new concepts in history or science? Has it helped to teach you life skills, such as independence and responsibility? Or, have you had a more negative experience with homework? Does it stress you out, numb your brain from busywork or actually make you fall behind in your classes?

Should we get rid of homework?

In “ The Movement to End Homework Is Wrong, ” published in July, the Times Opinion writer Jay Caspian Kang argues that homework may be imperfect, but it still serves an important purpose in school. The essay begins:

Do students really need to do their homework? As a parent and a former teacher, I have been pondering this question for quite a long time. The teacher side of me can acknowledge that there were assignments I gave out to my students that probably had little to no academic value. But I also imagine that some of my students never would have done their basic reading if they hadn’t been trained to complete expected assignments, which would have made the task of teaching an English class nearly impossible. As a parent, I would rather my daughter not get stuck doing the sort of pointless homework I would occasionally assign, but I also think there’s a lot of value in saying, “Hey, a lot of work you’re going to end up doing in your life is pointless, so why not just get used to it?” I certainly am not the only person wondering about the value of homework. Recently, the sociologist Jessica McCrory Calarco and the mathematics education scholars Ilana Horn and Grace Chen published a paper, “ You Need to Be More Responsible: The Myth of Meritocracy and Teachers’ Accounts of Homework Inequalities .” They argued that while there’s some evidence that homework might help students learn, it also exacerbates inequalities and reinforces what they call the “meritocratic” narrative that says kids who do well in school do so because of “individual competence, effort and responsibility.” The authors believe this meritocratic narrative is a myth and that homework — math homework in particular — further entrenches the myth in the minds of teachers and their students. Calarco, Horn and Chen write, “Research has highlighted inequalities in students’ homework production and linked those inequalities to differences in students’ home lives and in the support students’ families can provide.”

Mr. Kang argues:

But there’s a defense of homework that doesn’t really have much to do with class mobility, equality or any sense of reinforcing the notion of meritocracy. It’s one that became quite clear to me when I was a teacher: Kids need to learn how to practice things. Homework, in many cases, is the only ritualized thing they have to do every day. Even if we could perfectly equalize opportunity in school and empower all students not to be encumbered by the weight of their socioeconomic status or ethnicity, I’m not sure what good it would do if the kids didn’t know how to do something relentlessly, over and over again, until they perfected it. Most teachers know that type of progress is very difficult to achieve inside the classroom, regardless of a student’s background, which is why, I imagine, Calarco, Horn and Chen found that most teachers weren’t thinking in a structural inequalities frame. Holistic ideas of education, in which learning is emphasized and students can explore concepts and ideas, are largely for the types of kids who don’t need to worry about class mobility. A defense of rote practice through homework might seem revanchist at this moment, but if we truly believe that schools should teach children lessons that fall outside the meritocracy, I can’t think of one that matters more than the simple satisfaction of mastering something that you were once bad at. That takes homework and the acknowledgment that sometimes a student can get a question wrong and, with proper instruction, eventually get it right.

Students, read the entire article, then tell us:

Should we get rid of homework? Why, or why not?

Is homework an outdated, ineffective or counterproductive tool for learning? Do you agree with the authors of the paper that homework is harmful and worsens inequalities that exist between students’ home circumstances?

Or do you agree with Mr. Kang that homework still has real educational value?

When you get home after school, how much homework will you do? Do you think the amount is appropriate, too much or too little? Is homework, including the projects and writing assignments you do at home, an important part of your learning experience? Or, in your opinion, is it not a good use of time? Explain.

In these letters to the editor , one reader makes a distinction between elementary school and high school:

Homework’s value is unclear for younger students. But by high school and college, homework is absolutely essential for any student who wishes to excel. There simply isn’t time to digest Dostoyevsky if you only ever read him in class.

What do you think? How much does grade level matter when discussing the value of homework?

Is there a way to make homework more effective?

If you were a teacher, would you assign homework? What kind of assignments would you give and why?

Want more writing prompts? You can find all of our questions in our Student Opinion column . Teachers, check out this guide to learn how you can incorporate them into your classroom.

Students 13 and older in the United States and Britain, and 16 and older elsewhere, are invited to comment. All comments are moderated by the Learning Network staff, but please keep in mind that once your comment is accepted, it will be made public.

Jeremy Engle joined The Learning Network as a staff editor in 2018 after spending more than 20 years as a classroom humanities and documentary-making teacher, professional developer and curriculum designer working with students and teachers across the country. More about Jeremy Engle

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The Pros and Cons of Homework

Homework pro and cons

The dreaded word for students across the country—homework. 

Homework has long been a source of debate, with parents, educators, and education specialists debating the advantages of at-home study. There are many pros and cons of homework. We’ve examined a few significant points to provide you with a summary of the benefits and disadvantages of homework.

Check Out The Pros and Cons of Homework

homework pro and cons

Pro 1: Homework Helps to Improve Student Achievement

Homework teaches students various beneficial skills that they will carry with them throughout their academic and professional life, from time management and organization to self-motivation and autonomous learning. 

Homework helps students of all ages build critical study abilities that help them throughout their academic careers. Learning at home also encourages the development of good research habits while encouraging students to take ownership of their tasks.

If you’re finding that homework is becoming an issue at home, check out this article to learn how to tackle them before they get out of hand.

Con 1: Too Much Homework Can Negatively Affect Students 

You’ll often hear from students that they’re stressed out by schoolwork. Stress becomes even more apparent as students get into higher grade levels. 

A study conducted on high school student’s experiences found that high-achieving students found that too much homework leads to sleep deprivation and other health problems such as: 

  • Weight loss 
  • Stomach problems 

More than half of students say that homework is their primary source of stress, and we know what stress can do on our bodies.

It’s been shown that excessive homework can lead to cheating. With too much homework, students end up copying off one another in an attempt to finish all their assignments.

Pro 2: Homework Helps to Reinforce Classroom Learning

Homework is most effective when it allows students to revise what they learn in class. Did you know that students typically retain only 50% of the information teachers provide in class?

Students need to apply that information to learn it.

Homework also helps students develop key skills that they’ll use throughout their lives: 

  • Accountability 
  • Time management
  • Self-direction
  • Critical thinking
  • Independent problem-solving

The skills learned in homework can then be applied to other subjects and practical situations in students’ daily lives.

Con 2: Takes Away From Students Leisure Time

Children need free time. This free time allows children to relax and explore the world that they are living in. This free time also gives them valuable skills they wouldn’t learn in a classroom, such as riding a bike, reading a book, or socializing with friends and family. 

Having leisure time teaches kids valuable skills that cannot be acquired when doing their homework at a computer.

Plus, students need to get enough exercise. Getting exercise can improve cognitive function, which might be hindered by sedentary activities such as homework.

Pro 3: Homework Gets Parents Involved with Children’s Learning

Homework helps parents track what their children are learning in school. 

Also allows parents to see what their children’s academic strengths and weaknesses are. Homework can alert parents to any learning difficulties that their children might have, enabling them to provide assistance and modify their child’s learning approach as necessary.

Parents who help their children with homework will lead to higher academic performance, better social skills and behaviour, and greater self-confidence in their children.

Con 3: Homework Is Not Always Effective

Numerous researchers have attempted to evaluate the importance of homework and how it enhances academic performance. According to a study , homework in primary schools has a minimal effect since students pursue unrelated assignments instead of solidifying what they have already learned.

Mental health experts agree heavy homework loads have the capacity to do more harm than good for students. But they also say the answer may not be to eliminate homework altogether. So, unfortunately for students, homework is here to stay.

You can learn more about the pro and cons of homework here.

Need Help with Completing Homework Effectively?  

There are many pros and cons of homework, so let our tutors at Oxford Learning can help your family create great homework habits to ensure students are successful at homework.

Contact a location near you to get started today!

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Is Homework Necessary? Education Inequity and Its Impact on Students

cons of no homework

Schools are getting rid of homework from Essex, Mass., to Los Angeles, Calif. Although the no-homework trend may sound alarming, especially to parents dreaming of their child’s acceptance to Harvard, Stanford or Yale, there is mounting evidence that eliminating homework in grade school may actually have great benefits , especially with regard to educational equity.

In fact, while the push to eliminate homework may come as a surprise to many adults, the debate is not new . Parents and educators have been talking about this subject for the last century, so that the educational pendulum continues to swing back and forth between the need for homework and the need to eliminate homework.

The Problem with Homework: It Highlights Inequalities

How much homework is too much homework, when does homework actually help, negative effects of homework for students, how teachers can help.

One of the most pressing talking points around homework is how it disproportionately affects students from less affluent families. The American Psychological Association (APA) explained:

“Kids from wealthier homes are more likely to have resources such as computers, internet connections, dedicated areas to do schoolwork and parents who tend to be more educated and more available to help them with tricky assignments. Kids from disadvantaged homes are more likely to work at afterschool jobs, or to be home without supervision in the evenings while their parents work multiple jobs.”

[RELATED] How to Advance Your Career: A Guide for Educators >> 

While students growing up in more affluent areas are likely playing sports, participating in other recreational activities after school, or receiving additional tutoring, children in disadvantaged areas are more likely headed to work after school, taking care of siblings while their parents work or dealing with an unstable home life. Adding homework into the mix is one more thing to deal with — and if the student is struggling, the task of completing homework can be too much to consider at the end of an already long school day.

While all students may groan at the mention of homework, it may be more than just a nuisance for poor and disadvantaged children, instead becoming another burden to carry and contend with.

Beyond the logistical issues, homework can negatively impact physical health and stress — and once again this may be a more significant problem among economically disadvantaged youth who typically already have a higher stress level than peers from more financially stable families .

Yet, today, it is not just the disadvantaged who suffer from the stressors that homework inflicts. A 2014 CNN article, “Is Homework Making Your Child Sick?” , covered the issue of extreme pressure placed on children of the affluent. The article looked at the results of a study surveying more than 4,300 students from 10 high-performing public and private high schools in upper-middle-class California communities.

“Their findings were troubling: Research showed that excessive homework is associated with high stress levels, physical health problems and lack of balance in children’s lives; 56% of the students in the study cited homework as a primary stressor in their lives,” according to the CNN story. “That children growing up in poverty are at-risk for a number of ailments is both intuitive and well-supported by research. More difficult to believe is the growing consensus that children on the other end of the spectrum, children raised in affluence, may also be at risk.”

When it comes to health and stress it is clear that excessive homework, for children at both ends of the spectrum, can be damaging. Which begs the question, how much homework is too much?

The National Education Association and the National Parent Teacher Association recommend that students spend 10 minutes per grade level per night on homework . That means that first graders should spend 10 minutes on homework, second graders 20 minutes and so on. But a study published by The American Journal of Family Therapy found that students are getting much more than that.

While 10 minutes per day doesn’t sound like much, that quickly adds up to an hour per night by sixth grade. The National Center for Education Statistics found that high school students get an average of 6.8 hours of homework per week, a figure that is much too high according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). It is also to be noted that this figure does not take into consideration the needs of underprivileged student populations.

In a study conducted by the OECD it was found that “after around four hours of homework per week, the additional time invested in homework has a negligible impact on performance .” That means that by asking our children to put in an hour or more per day of dedicated homework time, we are not only not helping them, but — according to the aforementioned studies — we are hurting them, both physically and emotionally.

What’s more is that homework is, as the name implies, to be completed at home, after a full day of learning that is typically six to seven hours long with breaks and lunch included. However, a study by the APA on how people develop expertise found that elite musicians, scientists and athletes do their most productive work for about only four hours per day. Similarly, companies like Tower Paddle Boards are experimenting with a five-hour workday, under the assumption that people are not able to be truly productive for much longer than that. CEO Stephan Aarstol told CNBC that he believes most Americans only get about two to three hours of work done in an eight-hour day.

In the scope of world history, homework is a fairly new construct in the U.S. Students of all ages have been receiving work to complete at home for centuries, but it was educational reformer Horace Mann who first brought the concept to America from Prussia. 

Since then, homework’s popularity has ebbed and flowed in the court of public opinion. In the 1930s, it was considered child labor (as, ironically, it compromised children’s ability to do chores at home). Then, in the 1950s, implementing mandatory homework was hailed as a way to ensure America’s youth were always one step ahead of Soviet children during the Cold War. Homework was formally mandated as a tool for boosting educational quality in 1986 by the U.S. Department of Education, and has remained in common practice ever since.  

School work assigned and completed outside of school hours is not without its benefits. Numerous studies have shown that regular homework has a hand in improving student performance and connecting students to their learning. When reviewing these studies, take them with a grain of salt; there are strong arguments for both sides, and only you will know which solution is best for your students or school. 

Homework improves student achievement.

  • Source: The High School Journal, “ When is Homework Worth the Time?: Evaluating the Association between Homework and Achievement in High School Science and Math ,” 2012. 
  • Source: IZA.org, “ Does High School Homework Increase Academic Achievement? ,” 2014. **Note: Study sample comprised only high school boys. 

Homework helps reinforce classroom learning.

  • Source: “ Debunk This: People Remember 10 Percent of What They Read ,” 2015.

Homework helps students develop good study habits and life skills.

  • Sources: The Repository @ St. Cloud State, “ Types of Homework and Their Effect on Student Achievement ,” 2017; Journal of Advanced Academics, “ Developing Self-Regulation Skills: The Important Role of Homework ,” 2011.
  • Source: Journal of Advanced Academics, “ Developing Self-Regulation Skills: The Important Role of Homework ,” 2011.

Homework allows parents to be involved with their children’s learning.

  • Parents can see what their children are learning and working on in school every day. 
  • Parents can participate in their children’s learning by guiding them through homework assignments and reinforcing positive study and research habits.
  • Homework observation and participation can help parents understand their children’s academic strengths and weaknesses, and even identify possible learning difficulties.
  • Source: Phys.org, “ Sociologist Upends Notions about Parental Help with Homework ,” 2018.

While some amount of homework may help students connect to their learning and enhance their in-class performance, too much homework can have damaging effects. 

Students with too much homework have elevated stress levels. 

  • Source: USA Today, “ Is It Time to Get Rid of Homework? Mental Health Experts Weigh In ,” 2021.
  • Source: Stanford University, “ Stanford Research Shows Pitfalls of Homework ,” 2014.

Students with too much homework may be tempted to cheat. 

  • Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education, “ High-Tech Cheating Abounds, and Professors Bear Some Blame ,” 2010.
  • Source: The American Journal of Family Therapy, “ Homework and Family Stress: With Consideration of Parents’ Self Confidence, Educational Level, and Cultural Background ,” 2015.

Homework highlights digital inequity. 

  • Sources: NEAToday.org, “ The Homework Gap: The ‘Cruelest Part of the Digital Divide’ ,” 2016; CNET.com, “ The Digital Divide Has Left Millions of School Kids Behind ,” 2021.
  • Source: Investopedia, “ Digital Divide ,” 2022; International Journal of Education and Social Science, “ Getting the Homework Done: Social Class and Parents’ Relationship to Homework ,” 2015.
  • Source: World Economic Forum, “ COVID-19 exposed the digital divide. Here’s how we can close it ,” 2021.

Homework does not help younger students.

  • Source: Review of Educational Research, “ Does Homework Improve Academic Achievement? A Synthesis of Researcher, 1987-2003 ,” 2006.

To help students find the right balance and succeed, teachers and educators must start the homework conversation, both internally at their school and with parents. But in order to successfully advocate on behalf of students, teachers must be well educated on the subject, fully understanding the research and the outcomes that can be achieved by eliminating or reducing the homework burden. There is a plethora of research and writing on the subject for those interested in self-study.

For teachers looking for a more in-depth approach or for educators with a keen interest in educational equity, formal education may be the best route. If this latter option sounds appealing, there are now many reputable schools offering online master of education degree programs to help educators balance the demands of work and family life while furthering their education in the quest to help others.

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Pros and Cons of Homework

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“Not until you finish your homework.”

“I want you to finish your dinner and get right to work on your homework.”

“Is your homework done? Then, no, you get up those stairs and finish first.”

We’ve all heard something similar from our mom, dad, or caretaker. Homework is a big staple of the American school scene, just like lockers, the school bell, and big yellow buses. Portrayed in media from the Brady Bunch to Cocomelon, homework has been an academic given for decades. 

Despite its popularity, this after-school activity has been under scrutiny for over a century. Britannica explains , “In the early 1900s, progressive education theorists, championed by the magazine Ladies’ Home Journal , decried homework’s negative impact on children’s physical and mental health, leading California to ban homework for students under 15 from 1901 until 1917. In the 1930s, homework was portrayed as child labor, which was newly illegal, but the prevailing argument was that kids needed time to do household chores.”

Regardless of opposition, homework persevered, and millions of American students still spend long hours completing bookwork in their bedrooms after school. 

What are the modern objections to homework? What if the opposition is right? Is there merit to the concerns, or is homework a helpful tool for a well-rounded and comprehensive education? If you’d like to find out, now’s the time to keep reading!

How Much Time?

When analysts crunch the numbers, children spend far more time doing homework than many believe necessary. According to One Class, elementary school students spend an average of 42 minutes a day on homework. Some parents and educators argue that five additional hours of schoolwork per week is too much for elementary students. 

High schoolers spend even more time on after-school assignments. Pew Research published a 2019 article in which they explained , “Overall, teens (ages 15 to 17) spend an hour a day, on average, doing homework during the school year, up from 44 minutes a day about a decade ago and 30 minutes in the mid-1990s.”

Globally, the U.S. ranks 15th for the average amount of time spent on homework by high school students. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development conducted a worldwide study on 15-year-old students to evaluate the homework load for high schoolers worldwide. 

Among the countries included in the study, China ranked first, with students spending an average of 13.8 hours a week on homework. The Netherlands ranked the lowest, with their students studying after school for an average of 5.8 hours a week. American students spent an average of 6.1 hours per week completing their homework.

What Students Think

Homework has become a point of significant stress for American students. 

One Stanford study found that 56% of students who participated in the survey stated that homework was a primary source of stress. Another study found that the decline in adequate teenage sleep may be partly due to homework. In yet another study, 82% of students interviewed admitted that they were “often or always stressed by schoolwork.” 

It’s not just the students who object to frequent homework. Parents have begun to voice their displeasure as well. One mother in Canada went viral on social media when she announced that she and her husband were done watching their ten-year-old daughter stress over her homework every night. They decided that homework wasn’t a useful educational tool for their child.

Another mother in Kansas expressed how frustrating it is when her daughter has homework that she as a mother is unsure how to help with. “I feel bad for emailing a teacher in the evenings. I’m slightly annoyed at homework in general because I don’t know what the teacher taught.” 

What Teachers Think

Educators debate whether or not homework is a positive educational tool. One Duke University professor recommends homework, believing there is a correlation between homework and academic success for older students. He recommends implementing the “10 Minute Rule.” Essentially, students receive 10 minutes of homework per day for each grade. (For instance, 1st graders would receive 10 minutes of homework, 5th graders 50 minutes, 12th graders 120 minutes.)

A Texas teacher informed the parents of her 2nd-grade students that she would not be assigning homework anymore. Instead, she asked that the children participate in real-life activities that encourage growth and success. These activities included outdoor play, family meals, and reading with parents. As her plan evolved, she acknowledged that some students actually enjoyed homework and missed the challenge. Other students received extra work here and there on an as-needed basis. 

Defining the Need

One question that desperately needs to be asked is, “What’s the purpose of homework?” 

The answer to this question can provide parameters, determine whether or not homework achieves the goal(s), and establish if it should continue to be a staple in the American education system.

Psychology Today wonders the same thing , without any clear-cut resolution. “I started the blog with a question ‘What’s the purpose of homework?’ I’ll end with the same question. If a teacher who is assigning the homework can’t provide a clear rationale behind this question, then maybe the homework shouldn’t be assigned.”

However, Honest Pros and Cons makes a case for homework in more detail. Their reasoning for homework includes :

  • Practicing what they learn in the classroom
  • Improving study habits
  • Developing self-discipline
  • Enhancing independent problem-solving skills

McRel International notes that many factors play into whether or not homework is an effective strategy for students. They acknowledge that after-school assignments have pros and cons and state that the research is by no means definitive.

Proponents of homework present several positives: 

  • It improves student achievement – “Students in classes that were assigned homework outperformed 69% of students who didn’t have homework on both standardized tests and grades.” – Britannica ProCon

While the data is not conclusive, numerous studies have shown a correlation between academic success and the use of homework. 

  • It involves parents – “Homework is also the place where schools and families most frequently intersect.” – US News

Homework encourages parents and children to spend time together problem-solving and working toward a goal. It also gives parents a window into what their child is learning and the progress they are making. 

  • It encourages time management – “Homework is an effective tool when teaching your child about time management. This means that time management should extend beyond the classroom and into your home. ” – Edugage

American students spend roughly six hours a day at school. This schedule doesn’t leave much flexibility for sports, a social life, and a healthy amount of free time on top of homework. Kids have to learn time management if they want a life outside of their education. 

  • It tracks progress – “Homework allows teachers to track students’ progress, meaning that homework helps to find out the academic strengths and weaknesses of children.” – Honest Pros and Cons

Homework gives teachers a chance to see what the student can achieve independently. Students must put into practice what they learned in the schoolroom in a different environment and without their teacher present.

  • It develops working memory – “Revising the key skills learned in the classroom during homework increases the likelihood of a student remembering and being able to use those skills in a variety of situations in the future, contributing to their overall education.” – The Guardian

Environment can play an active part in memory. Biologically, our brains more easily recall memories and facts when we’re immersed in the same surroundings in which we created that memory or learned those facts. Homework removes the environmental factor, forcing students to strengthen their working memory. 

Concerned about the effects of homework on students, opponents note these objections:

  • The science isn’t settled – “There is no conclusive evidence that homework increases student achievement across the board.” – Reading Rockets

As we’ve noted before, the data isn’t conclusive despite the numerous studies conducted. To many, the negatives suggested by various studies outweigh the proposed positives.

  • It adds stress – “Researchers have found that students who spend too much time on homework experience more levels of stress and physical health problems.” – Psychology Today

Studies have concluded that too much homework creates undue stress on developing minds and bodies. This translates into mental, emotional, and physical issues for many students. This stress also affects their sleep , both the amount of sleep and the quality of that sleep. 

  • It impacts other interests/pursuits – “Homework prevents self-discovery and having the time to learn new skills outside of the school system.” – University of the People

Critics of homework fear that, in addition to time spent on school grounds, after-school assignments stunt students’ abilities to experience life outside academia. Students who struggle with completing work at home are even more susceptible to a lifestyle void of other interests. 

  • It expands the gap – “One study concluded that homework increases social inequality because it ‘potentially serves as a mechanism to further advantage those students who already experience some privilege in the school system while further disadvantaging those who may already be in a marginalized position.’” – Britannica ProCon

Homework often involves a computer and/or an internet connection. During the Covid-19 pandemic, 30% of students didn’t have the necessary technology at home to effectively participate in distance learning, raising questions about inequality affecting homework that relies on at-home technology. 

  • It creates family tension – “Assigning homework forces a person to take on added disciplinary responsibilities.” – Front Range Christian School  

While homework can bring children and parents together, it can also drive a wedge between them. Students who feel overwhelmed or who need a break from focusing on academics often buck their homework requirements, leaving parents to enforce education standards that the teachers created. Parents and students alike can end up frustrated, with little progress made. 

A World of Unknowns

While the homework debate rages on, researchers continue to work toward a conclusive answer. In the meantime, teachers, parents, schools, and communities can work together to find a solution that meets the needs of their students. 

Without a doubt, homework has positive aspects that encourage students to advance through personal and academic growth. The trick is to nurture this positivity without stunting progress with adverse side effects. 

It’s a double-edged sword that’s well worth considering to ensure the best for our kids.

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27 Top Homework Pros and Cons

homework pros and cons

There are both pros and cons of homework. This makes whether schools should assign homework a great debating topic for students.

On the side of the pros, homework is beneficial because it can be great for helping students get through their required coursework and reinforce required knowledge. But it also interferes with life outside of school.

Key arguments for homework include the fact it gives students structure, improves their learning, and improves parent-teacher relationships.

Arguments for the cons of homework include the fact it interferes with playtime and causes stress to children, leading to arguments that homework should be banned .

Pros and Cons of Homework (Table Summary)

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Pros of Homework

1. homework teaches discipline and habit.

Discipline and habit are two soft skills that children need to develop so they can succeed in life.

Regular daily homework is a simple way that discipline and habit are reinforced. Teachers can talk to students about what they do when they get home from school.

They might develop a habit like getting changed into a new set of clothes, having an afternoon snack, then getting out their homework.

Teachers can also help students visualize these habits and disciplines by talking about where they will do their homework (kitchen table?) and when .

2. Homework helps parents know what’s being learned in class

Parents often appreciate being kept in the loop about what is going on in their child’s classroom. Homework is great for this!

Teachers can set homework based on the current unit of work in the classroom. If the students are learning about dinosaurs, the homework can be a task on dinosaurs.

This helps the teachers to show the parents the valuable learning that’s taking place, and allows parents to feel comfortable that the teacher is doing a great job.

3. Homework teaches time management

Children often have a wide range of after school activities to undertake. They need to develop the skill of managing all these activities to fit homework in.

At school, children’s time is closely managed and controlled. Every lesson ends and begins with a bell or a teacher command.

At some point, children need to learn to manage their own time. Homework is an easy way to start refining this important soft skill.

4. Homework gives students self-paced learning time

At school, a lesson has a clear beginning and end. Students who are struggling may be interrupted and need more time. Homework allows them to work on these tasks at their own pace.

When I was studying math in high school, I never got my work done in time. I understood concepts slower than my peers, and I needed more time to reinforce concepts.

Homework was my chance to keep up, by studying at my own pace.

5. Homework can reduce screen time

Paper-based homework can take students away from their afternoon cartoons and video games and get them working on something of more value.

Screen time is one of the biggest concerns for educators and parents in the 21 st Century. Children spend approximately 5 to 7 hours in front of screens per day.

While screens aren’t all bad, children generally spend more time at screens than is necessary. Homework tasks such as collecting things from the yard or interviewing grandparents gets kids away from screens and into more active activities.

6. Homework gives students productive afternoon activities

Too often, children get home from school and switch off their brains by watching cartoons or playing video games. Homework can be more productive.

Good homework should get students actively thinking. A teacher can set homework that involves creating a product, conducting interviews with family, or writing a story based on things being learned in class.

But even homework that involves repetition of math and spelling tasks can be far more productive than simply watching television.

7. Homework reinforces information taught in class

For difficult tasks, students often need to be exposed to content over and over again until they reach mastery of the topic .

To do this, sometimes you need to do old-fashioned repetition of tasks. Take, for example, algebra. Students will need to repeat the process over and over again so that they will instinctively know how to complete the task when they sit their standardized test.

Of course, the teacher needs to teach and reinforce these foundational skills at school before independent homework practice takes place.

8. Homework helps motivated students to get ahead

Many students who have set themselves the goal of coming first in their class want to do homework to get an advantage over their peers.

Students who want to excel should not be stopped from doing this. If they enjoy homework and it makes them smarter or better at a task, then they should be allowed to do this.

9. Homework gives parents and children time together

When a parent helps their child with homework (by educating and quizzing them, not cheating!), they get a chance to bond.

Working together to complete a task can be good for the relationship between the parent and the child. The parents can also feel good that they’re supporting the child to become more educated.

10. Homework improves parent-teacher relationships

Parents get an inside look at what’s happening at school to improve their trust with the teacher, while also helping the teacher do their job.

Trust between parents and teachers is very important. Parents want to know the teacher is working hard to support students and help them learn. By looking at their children’s homework, they get a good idea of what’s going on in the classroom.

The parent can also feel good about helping the teacher’s mission by sitting with the child during homework and helping to reinforce what’s been learned at school.

11. Homework helps teachers get through the crowded curriculum

Teachers are increasingly asked to teach more and more content each year. Homework can be helpful in making sure it all gets done.

Decades ago, teachers had time to dedicate lessons to repeating and practicing content learned. Today, they’re under pressure to teach one thing then quickly move onto the next. We call this phenomenon the “crowded curriculum”.

Today, teachers may need to teach the core skills in class then ask students to go home and practice what’s been taught to fast-track learning.

12. Homework provides spaced repetition for long-term memorization

Spaced repetition is a strategy that involves quizzing students intermittently on things learned in previous weeks and months.

For example, if students learned division in January, they may forget about it by June. But if the teacher provides division questions for homework in January, March, and May, then the students always keep that knowledge of how to do division in their mind.

Spaced repetition theory states that regularly requiring students to recall information that’s been pushed to the back of their mind can help, over time, commit that information to their long-term memory and prevent long-term forgetting.

13. Homework supports a flipped learning model to make the most of time with the teacher

Flipped learning is a model of education where students do preparation before class so they get to class prepared to learn.

Examples of flipped learning include pre-teaching vocabulary (e.g. giving children new words to learn for homework that they will use in a future in-class lesson), and asking students to watch preparatory videos before class.

This model of homework isn’t about reinforcing things learned in class, but learning things before class to be more prepared for lessons.

14. Homework improves student achievement

An influential review of the literature on homework by Mazano and Pickering (2007) found that homework does improve student achievement.

Another review of the literature by Cooper, Robinson and Patall (2006) similarly found that homework improves achievement. In this review, the authors highlighted that homework appeared more beneficial for high school students’ grades than elementary school students’ grades.

Several progressive education critics , especially Alfie Kohn , have claimed that homework does not help student grades. We have not found the critics’ evidence to be as compelling.

15. Homework helps the education system keep up with other countries’ systems

All nations are competing with one another to have the best education system (measured by standardized tests ). If other countries are assigning homework and your country isn’t, your country will be at a disadvantage.

The main way education systems are compared is the OECD ranking of education systems. This ranking compared standardized test scores on major subjects.

Western nations have been slipping behind Asian nations for several decades. Many Asian education systems have a culture of assigning a lot of homework. To keep up, America may also need to assign homework and encourage their kids to do more homework.

See Also: Homework Statistics List

Cons of Homework

1. homework interferes with play time.

Play-based learning is some of the best learning that can possibly occurs. When children go home from school, the play they do before sunset is hugely beneficial for their development.

Homework can prevent children from playing. Instead, they’re stuck inside repeating tasks on standardized homework sheets.

Of course, if there is no homework, parents would have to make sure children are engaging in beneficial play as well, rather than simply watching TV.

2. Homework interferes with extracurricular activities

After school, many children want to participate in extracurricular activities like sporting and community events.

However, if too much homework is assigned to learners, their parents may not be able to sign them up to co-curricular activities in the school or extracurricular activities outside of the school. This can prevent students from having well-rounded holistic development.

3. Homework discourages students from going outside and getting exercise

Homework is usually an indoors activity. Usually, teachers will assign spelling, math, or science tasks to be repeated through the week on paper or a computer.

But children need time to go outside and get exercise. The CDC recommends children ages 6 to 17 need 60 minutes of moderate to intense exercise per day.

Unfortunately, being stuck indoors may prevent children from getting that much needed exercise for well-rounded development.

4. Homework leads to unsupervised and unsupportive learning

When students get stuck on a task at school, the teacher is there to help. But when students are stuck on a homework task, no support is available.

This leads to a situation where students’ learning and development is harmed. Furthermore, those students who do understand the task can go ahead and get more homework practice done while struggling students can’t progress because the teacher isn’t there to help them through their hurdles.

Often, it’s down to parents to pick up the challenge of teaching their children during homework time. Unfortunately, not all students have parents nearby to help them during homework time.

5. Homework can encourage cheating

When children study without supervision, they have the opportunity to cheat without suffering consequences.

They could, for example, copy their sibling’s homework or use the internet to find answers.

Worse, some parents may help their child to cheat or do the homework for the child. In these cases, homework has no benefit of the child but may teach them bad and unethical habits.

6. Homework contributes to a culture of poor work-life balance

Homework instils a corporate attitude that prioritizes work above everything else. It prepares students for a social norm where you do work for your job even when you’re off the clock.

Students will grow up thinking it’s normal to clock off from their job, go home, and continue to check emails and complete work they didn’t get done during the day.

This sort of culture is bad for society. It interferes with family and recreation time and encourages bosses to behave like they’re in charge of your whole life.

7. Homework discourages children from taking up hobbies

There is an argument to be made that children need spare time so they can learn about what they like and don’t like.

If students have spare time after school, they could fill it up with hobbies. The student can think about what they enjoy (playing with dolls, riding bikes, singing, writing stories).

Downtime encourages people to develop hobbies. Students need this downtime, and homework can interfere with this.

8. Homework creates unfairness between children with parents helping and those who don’t

At school, students generally have a level playing field. They are all in the same classroom with the same resources and the same teacher. At home, it’s a different story.

Some children have parents, siblings, and internet to rely upon. Meanwhile, others have nothing but themselves and a pen.

Those children who are lucky enough to have parents helping out can get a significant advantage over their peers, causing unfairness and inequalities that are not of their own making.

9. Homework causes stress and anxiety

In a study by Galloway, Connor and Pope (2013), they found that 56% of students identified homework as the greatest cause of stress in their lives.

Stress among young people can impact their happiness and mental health. Furthermore, there is an argument to “let kids be kids”. We have a whole life of work and pressure ahead of us. Childhood is a time to be enjoyed without the pressures of life.

10. Homework is often poor-quality work

Teachers will often assign homework that is the less important work and doesn’t have a clear goal.

Good teachers know that a lesson needs to be planned-out with a beginning, middle and end. There usually should be formative assessment as well, which is assessment of students as they learn (rather than just at the end).

But homework doesn’t have the structure of a good lesson. It’s repetition of information already learned, which is a behaviorist learning model that is now outdated for many tasks.

11. Homework is solitary learning

Most education theorists today believe that the best learning occurs in social situations.

Sociocultural learning requires students to express their thoughts and opinions and listen to other people’s ideas. This helps them improve and refine their own thinking through dialogue.

But homework usually takes place alone at the kitchen table. Students don’t have anyone to talk with about what they’re doing, meaning their learning is limited.

12. Homework widens social inequality

Homework can advantage wealthier students and disadvantage poorer students.

In Kralovec and Buell’s (2001) book The End of Homework: How Homework Disrupts Families, Overburdens Children, and Limits Learning , the authors argue that poorer students are less likely to have the resources to complete their homework properly.

For example, they might not have the pens, paper, and drawing implements to complete a paper task. Similarly, they might not have the computer, internet connection, or even books to do appropriate research at home.

Parents in poorer households also often work shift work and multiple jobs meaning they have less time to help their children with their homework.

Homework can be both good and bad – there are both advantages and disadvantages of homework. In general, it’s often the case that it depends on the type of homework that is assigned. Well-planned homework used in moderation and agreed upon by teachers, parents and students can be helpful. But other homework can cause serious stress, inequality, and lifestyle imbalance for students.

Cooper, H., Robinson, J. C., & Patall, E. A. (2006). Does homework improve academic achievement? A synthesis of research, 1987–2003.  Review of educational research ,  76 (1), 1-62.

Galloway, M., Conner, J., & Pope, D. (2013). Nonacademic effects of homework in privileged, high-performing high schools.  The journal of experimental education ,  81 (4), 490-510. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/00220973.2012.745469

Kralovec, E., & Buell, J. (2001).  The end of homework: How homework disrupts families, overburdens children, and limits learning . Beacon Press.

Pressman, R. M., Sugarman, D. B., Nemon, M. L., Desjarlais, J., Owens, J. A., & Schettini-Evans, A. (2015). Homework and family stress: With consideration of parents’ self confidence, educational level, and cultural background.  The American Journal of Family Therapy ,  43 (4), 297-313. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/01926187.2015.1061407

Ren, H., Zhou, Z., Liu, W., Wang, X., & Yin, Z. (2017). Excessive homework, inadequate sleep, physical inactivity and screen viewing time are major contributors to high paediatric obesity.  Acta Paediatrica ,  106 (1), 120-127. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1111/apa.13640

Yeo, S. C., Tan, J., Lo, J. C., Chee, M. W., & Gooley, J. J. (2020). Associations of time spent on homework or studying with nocturnal sleep behavior and depression symptoms in adolescents from Singapore.  Sleep Health ,  6 (6), 758-766. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2020.04.011

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15 Should Homework Be Banned Pros and Cons

Homework was a staple of the public and private schooling experience for many of us growing up. There were long nights spent on book reports, science projects, and all of those repetitive math sheets. In many ways, it felt like an inevitable part of the educational experience. Unless you could power through all of your assignments during your free time in class, then there was going to be time spent at home working on specific subjects.

More schools are looking at the idea of banning homework from the modern educational experience. Instead of sending work home with students each night, they are finding alternative ways to ensure that each student can understand the curriculum without involving the uncertainty of parental involvement.

Although banning homework might seem like an unorthodox process, there are legitimate advantages to consider with this effort. There are some disadvantages which some families may encounter as well.

These are the updated lists of the pros and cons of banning homework to review.

List of the Pros of Banning Homework

1. Giving homework to students does not always improve their academic outcomes. The reality of homework for the modern student is that we do not know if it is helpful to have extra work assigned to them outside of the classroom. Every study that has looked at the subject has had design flaws which causes the data collected to be questionable at best. Although there is some information to suggest that students in seventh grade and higher can benefit from limited homework, banning it for students younger than that seems to be beneficial for their learning experience.

2. Banning homework can reduce burnout issues with students. Teachers are seeing homework stress occur in the classroom more frequently today than ever before. Almost half of all high school teachers in North America have seen this issue with their students at some point during the year. About 25% of grade school teachers say that they have seen the same thing.

When students are dealing with the impact of homework on their lives, it can have a tremendously adverse impact. One of the most cited reasons for students dropping out of school is that they cannot complete their homework on time.

3. Banning homework would increase the amount of family time available to students. Homework creates a significant disruption to family relationships. Over half of all parents in North America say that they have had a significant argument with their children over homework in the past month. 1/3 of families say that homework is their primary source of struggle in the home. Not only does it reduce the amount of time that everyone has to spend together, it reduces the chances that parents have to teach their own skills and belief systems to their kids.

4. It reduces the negative impact of homework on the health of a student. Many students suffer academically when they cannot finish a homework assignment on time. Although assumptions are often made about the time management skills of the individual when this outcome occurs, the reasons why it happens is usually more complex. It may be too difficult, too boring, or there may not be enough time in the day to complete the work.

When students experience failure in this area, it can lead to severe mental health issues. Some perceive themselves as a scholarly failure, which translates to an inability to live life successfully. It can disrupt a desire to learn. There is even an increased risk of suicide for some youth because of this issue. Banning it would reduce these risks immediately.

5. Eliminating homework would allow for an established sleep cycle. The average high school student requires between 8-10 hours of sleep to function at their best the next day. Grade-school students may require an extra hour or two beyond that figure. When teachers assign homework, then it increases the risk for each individual that they will not receive the amount that they require each night.

When children do not get enough sleep, a significant rest deficit occurs which can impact their ability to pay attention in school. It can cause unintended weight gain. There may even be issues with emotional control. Banning homework would help to reduce these risks as well.

6. It increases the amount of socialization time that students receive. People who are only spending time in school and then going home to do more work are at a higher risk of experiencing loneliness and isolation. When these emotions are present, then a student is more likely to feel “down and out” mentally and physically. They lack meaningful connections with other people. These feelings are the health equivalent of smoking 15 cigarettes per day. If students are spending time on homework, then they are not spending time connecting with their family and friends.

7. It reduces the repetition that students face in the modern learning process. Most of the tasks that homework requires of students is repetitive and uninteresting. Kids love to resolve challenges on tasks that they are passionate about at that moment in their lives. Forcing them to complete the same problems repetitively as a way to “learn” core concepts can create issues with knowledge retention later in life. When you add in the fact that most lessons sent for homework must be done by themselves, banning homework will reduce the repetition that students face, allowing for a better overall outcome.

8. Home environments can be chaotic. Although some students can do homework in a quiet room without distractions, that is not the case for most kids. There are numerous events that happen at home which can pull a child’s attention away from the work that their teacher wants them to do. It isn’t just the Internet, video games, and television which are problematic either. Household chores, family issues, employment, and athletic requirements can make it a challenge to get the assigned work finished on time.

List of the Cons of Banning Homework

1. Homework allows parents to be involved with the educational process. Parents need to know what their children are learning in school. Even if they ask their children about what they are learning, the answers tend to be in generalities instead of specifics. By sending home work from the classroom, it allows parents to see and experience the work that their kids are doing when they are in school during the day. Then moms and dads can get involved with the learning process to reinforce the core concepts that were discovered by their children each day.

2. It can help parents and teachers identify learning disabilities. Many children develop a self-defense mechanism which allows them to appear like any other kid that is in their classroom. This process allows them to hide learning disabilities which may be hindering their educational progress. The presence of homework makes it possible for parents and teachers to identify this issue because kids can’t hide their struggles when they must work 1-on-1 with their parents on specific subjects. Banning homework would eliminate 50% of the opportunities to identify potential issues immediately.

3. Homework allows teachers to observe how their students understand the material. Teachers often use homework as a way to gauge how well a student is understanding the materials they are learning. Although some might point out that assignments and exams in the classroom can do the same thing, testing often requires preparation at home. It creates more anxiety and stress sometimes then even homework does. That is why banning it can be problematic for some students. Some students experience more pressure than they would during this assessment process when quizzes and tests are the only measurement of their success.

4. It teaches students how to manage their time wisely. As people grow older, they realize that time is a finite commodity. We must manage it wisely to maximize our productivity. Homework assignments are a way to encourage the development of this skill at an early age. The trick is to keep the amount of time required for the work down to a manageable level. As a general rule, students should spend about 10 minutes each school day doing homework, organizing their schedule around this need. If there are scheduling conflicts, then this process offers families a chance to create priorities.

5. Homework encourages students to be accountable for their role. Teachers are present in the classroom to offer access to information and skill-building opportunities that can improve the quality of life for each student. Administrators work to find a curriculum that will benefit the most people in an efficient way. Parents work hard to ensure their kids make it to school on time, follow healthy routines, and communicate with their school district to ensure the most effective learning opportunities possible. None of that matters if the student is not invested in the work in the first place. Homework assignments not only teach children how to work independently, but they also show them how to take responsibility for their part of the overall educational process.

6. It helps to teach important life lessons. Homework is an essential tool in the development of life lessons, such as communicating with others or comprehending something they have just read. It teaches kids how to think, solve problems, and even build an understanding for the issues that occur in our society right now. Many of the issues that lead to the idea to ban homework occur because someone in the life of a student communicated to them that this work was a waste of time. There are times in life when people need to do things that they don’t like or want to do. Homework helps a student begin to find the coping skills needed to be successful in that situation.

7. Homework allows for further research into class materials. Most classrooms offer less than 1 hour of instruction per subject during the day. For many students, that is not enough time to obtain a firm grasp on the materials being taught. Having homework assignments allows a student to perform more research, using their at-home tools to take a deeper look into the materials that would otherwise be impossible if homework was banned. That process can lead to a more significant understanding of the concepts involved, reducing anxiety levels because they have a complete grasp on the materials.

The pros and cons of banning homework is a decision that ultimately lies with each school district. Parents always have the option to pursue homeschooling or online learning if they disagree with the decisions that are made in this area. Whether you’re for more homework or want to see less of it, we can all agree on the fact that the absence of any reliable data about its usefulness makes it a challenge to know for certain which option is the best one to choose in this debate.

Should Kids Get Homework?

Homework gives elementary students a way to practice concepts, but too much can be harmful, experts say.

Mother helping son with homework at home

Effective homework reinforces math, reading, writing or spelling skills, but in a way that's meaningful. (Getty Images)

How much homework students should get has long been a source of debate among parents and educators. In recent years, some districts have even implemented no-homework policies, as students juggle sports, music and other activities after school.

Parents of elementary school students, in particular, have argued that after-school hours should be spent with family or playing outside rather than completing assignments. And there is little research to show that homework improves academic achievement for elementary students.

But some experts say there's value in homework, even for younger students. When done well, it can help students practice core concepts and develop study habits and time management skills. The key to effective homework, they say, is keeping assignments related to classroom learning, and tailoring the amount by age: Many experts suggest no homework for kindergartners, and little to none in first and second grade.

Value of Homework

Homework provides a chance to solidify what is being taught in the classroom that day, week or unit. Practice matters, says Janine Bempechat, clinical professor at Boston University 's Wheelock College of Education & Human Development.

"There really is no other domain of human ability where anybody would say you don't need to practice," she adds. "We have children practicing piano and we have children going to sports practice several days a week after school. You name the domain of ability and practice is in there."

Homework is also the place where schools and families most frequently intersect.

"The children are bringing things from the school into the home," says Paula S. Fass, professor emerita of history at the University of California—Berkeley and the author of "The End of American Childhood." "Before the pandemic, (homework) was the only real sense that parents had to what was going on in schools."

Harris Cooper, professor emeritus of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University and author of "The Battle Over Homework," examined more than 60 research studies on homework between 1987 and 2003 and found that — when designed properly — homework can lead to greater student success. Too much, however, is harmful. And homework has a greater positive effect on students in secondary school (grades 7-12) than those in elementary.

"Every child should be doing homework, but the amount and type that they're doing should be appropriate for their developmental level," he says. "For teachers, it's a balancing act. Doing away with homework completely is not in the best interest of children and families. But overburdening families with homework is also not in the child's or a family's best interest."

Negative Homework Assignments

Not all homework for elementary students involves completing a worksheet. Assignments can be fun, says Cooper, like having students visit educational locations, keep statistics on their favorite sports teams, read for pleasure or even help their parents grocery shop. The point is to show students that activities done outside of school can relate to subjects learned in the classroom.

But assignments that are just busy work, that force students to learn new concepts at home, or that are overly time-consuming can be counterproductive, experts say.

Homework that's just busy work.

Effective homework reinforces math, reading, writing or spelling skills, but in a way that's meaningful, experts say. Assignments that look more like busy work – projects or worksheets that don't require teacher feedback and aren't related to topics learned in the classroom – can be frustrating for students and create burdens for families.

"The mental health piece has definitely played a role here over the last couple of years during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the last thing we want to do is frustrate students with busy work or homework that makes no sense," says Dave Steckler, principal of Red Trail Elementary School in Mandan, North Dakota.

Homework on material that kids haven't learned yet.

With the pressure to cover all topics on standardized tests and limited time during the school day, some teachers assign homework that has not yet been taught in the classroom.

Not only does this create stress, but it also causes equity challenges. Some parents speak languages other than English or work several jobs, and they aren't able to help teach their children new concepts.

" It just becomes agony for both parents and the kids to get through this worksheet, and the goal becomes getting to the bottom of (the) worksheet with answers filled in without any understanding of what any of it matters for," says professor Susan R. Goldman, co-director of the Learning Sciences Research Institute at the University of Illinois—Chicago .

Homework that's overly time-consuming.

The standard homework guideline recommended by the National Parent Teacher Association and the National Education Association is the "10-minute rule" – 10 minutes of nightly homework per grade level. A fourth grader, for instance, would receive a total of 40 minutes of homework per night.

But this does not always happen, especially since not every student learns the same. A 2015 study published in the American Journal of Family Therapy found that primary school children actually received three times the recommended amount of homework — and that family stress increased along with the homework load.

Young children can only remain attentive for short periods, so large amounts of homework, especially lengthy projects, can negatively affect students' views on school. Some individual long-term projects – like having to build a replica city, for example – typically become an assignment for parents rather than students, Fass says.

"It's one thing to assign a project like that in which several kids are working on it together," she adds. "In (that) case, the kids do normally work on it. It's another to send it home to the families, where it becomes a burden and doesn't really accomplish very much."

Private vs. Public Schools

Do private schools assign more homework than public schools? There's little research on the issue, but experts say private school parents may be more accepting of homework, seeing it as a sign of academic rigor.

Of course, not all private schools are the same – some focus on college preparation and traditional academics, while others stress alternative approaches to education.

"I think in the academically oriented private schools, there's more support for homework from parents," says Gerald K. LeTendre, chair of educational administration at Pennsylvania State University—University Park . "I don't know if there's any research to show there's more homework, but it's less of a contentious issue."

How to Address Homework Overload

First, assess if the workload takes as long as it appears. Sometimes children may start working on a homework assignment, wander away and come back later, Cooper says.

"Parents don't see it, but they know that their child has started doing their homework four hours ago and still not done it," he adds. "They don't see that there are those four hours where their child was doing lots of other things. So the homework assignment itself actually is not four hours long. It's the way the child is approaching it."

But if homework is becoming stressful or workload is excessive, experts suggest parents first approach the teacher, followed by a school administrator.

"Many times, we can solve a lot of issues by having conversations," Steckler says, including by "sitting down, talking about the amount of homework, and what's appropriate and not appropriate."

Study Tips for High School Students

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Major 10 Reasons Why Students Should Not Have Homework In 2023

10 Reasons Why Students Should Not Have Homework

Homework – something students always get, but is it good or just extra work? People, like parents and teachers, have different thoughts on this. In this blog, we are going to dig deep into 10 reasons why students should avoid homework.

We will also determine when students can bring their phones to school in 2023. First, let’s understand what homework really is and why some folks say it’s not so great. We will learn about the good side of no homework and discover some interesting facts that support saying no to homework. So, let’s see if homework is helpful or not. 

Stay tuned to learn more about 10 reasons why students should not have homework.

What Is Homework?

Table of Contents

Homework is a school task that teachers give to students to do outside of the classroom. It’s like extra practice to help you learn more about what you study in school. Homework can be reading a book, doing math problems, writing about a topic, or other assignments. When you finish your homework, you show what you’ve learned and get better at your school subjects.

Homework is also a way for teachers to see how well you understand what they taught in class. It’s like a way for you to show what you’ve learned. Most homework assignments have a deadline, therefore it is critical that you complete it on time in order to gain knowledge and advance your abilities. It is a chance to practice and get better at the things you’re learning in school, which can help you do well in your tests and exams.

Why Is Homework Bad?

Homework can sometimes be bad for a few reasons. First, it can lead to stress and burnout, overwhelming students with too much work. Second, it can take away time that kids need for other important things like family time, sports, or just relaxing. Additionally, it might not always be useful, as some homework tasks might not help students learn better. Moreover, it can create inequality, as not all students have the same resources or help at home to complete their homework. Lastly, it can sometimes feel boring and repetitive, making kids dislike learning.

  • Causes stress and burnout
  • Takes away time from other important activities
  • It may not always be useful for learning
  • Creates inequality between students
  • It can be boring and repetitive, leading to a dislike of learning

10 Reasons Why Students Should Not Have Homework 

Here we will discuss 10 reasons why students should not have homework: 

1. Too Much Work

Homework can be like having too much to do. Students get many assignments, and it can become very stressful. This means they have less time for fun things like sports, hanging out with friends, or just relaxing. This stress can make them feel anxious, and it can be challenging to find a balance in their lives. Students need time to breathe and be kids.

2. Less Family Time

Homework takes away time that students could spend with their families. They end up spending long hours doing homework, which leaves less time to be with their parents, siblings, or other family members. This can lead to weaker family bonds and make it harder to build good relationships. Strong families are important for kids’ happiness and growth.

3. Health Problems

Too much homework can harm a student’s health. It can make them lose sleep, worry a lot, and even cause physical health problems like headaches or stomachaches. It’s important for students to be healthy and happy, so too much homework isn’t good for them. Good health is the foundation of a good life.

4. Less Time to Explore

Homework can stop students from trying new things and finding their interests. When they have to spend so much time on homework, they can’t explore their interests or develop their hobbies. This can hold them back from personal growth. Exploring and learning about the world is an important part of growing up.

5. Unequal Opportunities

Not all students have the same help and resources for homework. Some have more support and better tools, while others may not. This can make educational inequalities worse, as students with less support can struggle more, making it harder for them to succeed in school. Every student deserves a fair chance.

6. Boring and Repetitive

Homework can become very boring and repetitive. When students do the same kinds of assignments over and over, it can make them lose interest in learning. They may just do the work to finish it, without really understanding or enjoying the subject. Learning should be fun and exciting.

7. Not Really Learning

Homework can lead to memorization without real understanding. Instead of really learning, students might just try to finish the assignments as quickly as possible. This doesn’t help them learn well in the long run. We want students to understand and enjoy what they’re learning.

8. No Personal Time

Students need time for themselves to relax, do things they enjoy, and take care of themselves. Too much homework means they have very little time for these important activities. Learning how to manage time and take care of oneself is important for their growth. Personal time is crucial for a well-rounded life.

9. Kills Creativity

Homework can make it hard for students to think creatively and solve problems. With so much work to do, they don’t have time for open-minded, creative thinking. This kind of thinking is important for solving real-life problems and coming up with new ideas. Creative thinking helps us tackle the big challenges of the world.

10. Debate Over Value

People don’t all agree on whether homework really helps students learn. Some studies say it does, while others say it doesn’t make much difference. Since it’s not clear, it’s worth thinking about whether the time spent on homework could be used for other activities that we know help students learn better. It’s important to use time wisely and focus on what really works for students.

Advantages Of Having No Homework

Here are some advantages of having no homework: 

1. More Free Time

Not having homework means students have more free time after school. This extra time can be used for hobbies, sports, spending time with family, or simply relaxing. It allows kids to be more well-rounded and happy.

2. Less Stress

Without homework, students experience less stress. They don’t have to worry about tight deadlines or piles of assignments, so they can focus on learning in a more relaxed and healthier way.

3. Better Sleep

No homework means better sleep. Students can go to bed at a reasonable time, ensuring they are well-rested and ready to concentrate during school hours.

4. Opportunities for Exploration

When there’s no homework, students have more opportunities to explore their interests and learn about things they are passionate about. They can read books, explore new topics, or work on personal projects.

5. Improved Family Time

The absence of homework allows for improved family time. Parents and kids can get to know each other, share experiences, and make the home a loving and caring place. This strengthens family relationships and creates a more positive atmosphere.

Read More 

How To Stop Procrastinating On Homework

How to Get Motivated to Do Homework

Interesting Facts On Why Homework Should Be Banned

Here are some interesting facts on why homework should be banned: 

1. Negative Impact on Health

Homework should be banned because it can have a negative impact on a student’s health. Spending long hours on homework can lead to stress, sleep deprivation, and a sedentary lifestyle, which are harmful to physical and mental well-being.

2. Reduces Family Time

Homework takes away precious family time. When students are buried in assignments, they have less time to spend with their families, leading to a decrease in family bonding and support.

3. Inequality in Resources

Homework can lead to inequality. Not all students have access to the same resources, such as a quiet place to study, internet, or parental assistance, making it unfair to some students.

4. No Proven Benefits

Despite its prevalence, homework doesn’t always show clear academic benefits. Research suggests that the advantages of homework are often minimal, and banning it might not affect students’ learning negatively.

5. Increased Stress Levels

Homework can increase stress levels, which can be detrimental to a student’s mental health. Stress can make you anxious, depressed, and not want to learn.

6. Encourages Cheating

The pressure to complete homework on time can encourage cheating and plagiarism, undermining the honesty and integrity of education.

7. Reduces Creativity

Homework can be rigid and repetitive, leaving little room for creativity and independent thinking, which are essential for a well-rounded education. Banning homework can encourage more creative and flexible learning approaches.

Is Homework Is Bad Or Good For Students – From Parents & Teachers Perspective

From a parent’s perspective, homework can be a topic of debate. Some parents see both the downsides and benefits of homework, and it’s essential to consider both sides:

On the Bad Side

  • Excessive Stress: Many parents worry that homework can cause their children excessive stress and anxiety, especially when the workload is overwhelming.
  • Less Family Time: Homework can reduce the quality family time parents can spend with their children. They may want to prioritize bonding and relaxation.
  • Struggle with Complex Subjects : Parents may find it challenging to help their children with complex or unfamiliar subjects, leading to frustration for both.
  • Lack of Playtime: Homework can limit a child’s playtime, which is vital for their physical and social development .
  • Dislike for Learning: If homework becomes too burdensome or boring, it can lead to children developing a dislike for learning, which parents want to avoid.

On the Good Side

  • Practice and Reinforcement: Homework provides an opportunity for children to practice and reinforce what they’ve learned in school.
  • Preparation for Responsibility: Homework teaches kids responsibility and time management, valuable life skills.
  • Parental Involvement: Homework allows parents to be involved in their children’s education, offering support and guidance.
  • Monitoring Progress : It enables parents to monitor their child’s academic progress and identify areas where additional help may be needed.
  • Preparation for the Real World: Students can get ready for the tasks and due dates they will face in the future by doing their homework.

From a teacher’s perspective, homework is a topic with its own set of pros and cons:

  • Inequality in Resources: Teachers might be concerned that some students have better resources at home, such as access to the internet or parental assistance, creating inequality in completing homework.
  • Overburdening Students: Teachers may worry about overburdening students with excessive homework, potentially causing stress, burnout, and negatively impacting their well-being.
  • Lack of Proven Benefits: Some teachers may question the effectiveness of homework, as research does not always clearly demonstrate its academic advantages.
  • Cheating and Plagiarism: Teachers have to be vigilant about cheating and plagiarism, as the pressure to complete homework may push students to unethical behaviors.
  • Potential for Repetition: Teachers might be concerned that homework assignments could become repetitive and dull, leading to a decrease in students’ motivation to learn.
  • Reinforcement of Learning: Homework provides students with opportunities to reinforce what they’ve learned in class, which is important for understanding and retaining the material.
  • Preparation for Responsibility: Homework helps students develop responsibility, time management, and organizational skills, which are valuable for their future.
  • Parental Involvement: Homework encourages parental involvement in a child’s education, allowing for a stronger partnership between teachers and parents.
  • Assessment of Progress: Teachers can see how their students are doing and see where they might need more help by giving them homework.
  • Preparation for the Real World: Students can become more responsible and disciplined by doing their homework. It helps them get used to the duties and limits they will face in real life.

Debate about homework continues, and there are ten good reasons why students should not have homework. First, it can make kids stressed and tired. It also takes away time from family and fun activities, which are important. Homework might not help students learn much. 

Moreover, it can even make some students cheat or copy from others. Many students and parents say we should have less or no homework. They believe that focusing on good teaching in class is better than too much homework. So, the idea of reducing homework or even getting rid of it is something many people support.

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20 Pros and Cons of Homework

Pros And Cons Of Homework

Are you tired of the never-ending debate over homework? Do you find yourself wondering if all those hours spent on assignments are worth it?

Well, fear not! This article will provide you with an overview of the pros and cons of homework, as well as some alternative approaches to traditional homework.

As you read on, prepare to be intrigued by the rhetorical device used in this introduction. It is called a rhetorical question, which is a powerful tool used to engage readers and encourage them to think critically about a topic.

So get ready to explore the benefits and drawbacks of homework, and discover ways to find a balance that works for you!

Table of Contents

Pros of Homework

  • Reinforces Learning: Homework allows students to practice what they have learned in class. By engaging with the material outside of the classroom, students often internalize information better. Repeated exposure and practice can lead to mastery of a subject.
  • Develops Time Management Skills: Regular homework helps students develop the ability to plan their tasks, prioritize, and allocate their time efficiently. These time management skills prove beneficial not only academically but also in real-life situations.
  • Encourages Responsibility: Having regular assignments ensures that students take responsibility for their learning. They are accountable for completing and submitting tasks, fostering a sense of discipline and commitment to their work.
  • Provides Feedback: Homework allows teachers to gauge a student’s understanding of the material. If many students struggle with the same assignment, it indicates that a concept may need to be revisited or taught differently in the classroom.
  • Encourages Independent Learning: Assignments given for home challenge students to research and find answers independently. This nurtures research skills, critical thinking, and the ability to learn autonomously, which can be beneficial in higher education and work environments.
  • Allows for Customization: Teachers can tailor homework assignments to the needs of individual students. Those needing more practice can be given additional problems, while advanced students can explore more complex tasks, ensuring that everyone is catered to according to their learning pace.
  • Bridges the Home-School Gap: Homework can serve as a communication tool between parents and teachers. Parents become more involved in their child’s education, gaining insight into what is being taught and how their child is progressing.
  • Prepares for Future Lessons: Some homework assignments introduce new concepts that will be discussed in upcoming lessons. This gives students a head start, allowing them to grasp the concepts faster when they are formally introduced.
  • Encourages Lifelong Learning: By cultivating the habit of studying outside of classroom hours, students are more likely to continue seeking knowledge throughout their lives, embracing learning as a lifelong endeavor.
  • Allows for Creative Expression: Projects or assignments that are open-ended give students the chance to express their understanding in creative ways. They can use various mediums or methods to demonstrate their grasp of a topic, promoting innovation.

Cons of Homework

  • Stress and Burnout: Excessive amounts of homework can lead to student stress and burnout. Students may feel overwhelmed by the constant pressure of assignments, leading to a decrease in motivation and a potential aversion to learning.
  • Takes Away from Leisure and Extracurricular Activities: Heavy homework loads can deprive students of the time to engage in hobbies, sports, and other extracurricular activities. This imbalance can affect their overall well-being and development.
  • Unequal Access to Resources: Not all students have equal access to resources like textbooks, internet, or a quiet place to study. This disparity can make homework a challenging task for some, further widening the academic gap.
  • Potential for Cheating: With the vast amount of resources available online, there is an increased temptation for students to find answers without working through problems themselves, which defeats the purpose of learning.
  • Diminishing Returns: After a certain point, the educational benefit of homework starts to diminish. Hours of assignments may not necessarily lead to better understanding or improved grades, but instead just fatigue.
  • Reduces Quality Family Time: With students spending hours on homework, it leaves less time for family interactions. This reduced family time can impact the development of interpersonal relationships and values.
  • Potential for Poor Quality Work: When students feel burdened by large amounts of homework, they might rush through assignments, compromising on quality. This hurried approach can result in a lack of deep understanding.
  • Physical Health Concerns: Spending extended periods of time on homework can lead to issues like eye strain, poor posture, or lack of physical activity. This can have long-term health implications for students.
  • Can Exacerbate Inequalities: Teachers might unintentionally judge students based on the quality of their homework without considering their home environment, leading to biased assessments that favor students from more privileged backgrounds.
  • Potential Loss of Interest: Continuous pressure to complete homework can sometimes lead to a loss of interest in a subject. Instead of fostering a love for learning, it might make the subject feel tedious and burdensome.

Advantages of Homework

The benefits of assigning tasks for students to complete outside of the classroom extend beyond simple academic reinforcement. Homework has been shown to help students develop time-management skills, responsibility, and self-discipline. By completing assignments on their own time, students learn how to prioritize their workload and manage their time effectively.

Homework also provides an opportunity for parents to get involved in their child’s education. When parents take an active role in helping with homework, they can better understand what their child is learning and identify any areas where extra support may be needed. This involvement can lead to a stronger parent-child relationship and a more supportive home environment for the student.

Despite these benefits, there are also drawbacks to assigning homework. Some argue that it can create unnecessary stress and anxiety for students, especially when they have multiple assignments due at once. Additionally, not all students have access to the resources they need to complete homework assignments outside of school, such as computers or quiet study spaces.

Incorporating homework into a student’s education should be done thoughtfully and with consideration for each individual student’s needs and circumstances. By carefully balancing the benefits and drawbacks of homework, educators can help ensure that it remains a valuable tool for promoting academic success while minimizing any negative effects on students’ well-being.

Negatives of Homework

Ain’t it just great how spending hours on meaningless assignments every night can really enhance our stress levels and decrease our love for learning? Homework has been a hot topic of debate for years, and the cons of homework cannot be ignored.

Students are expected to complete assignments after school, which leads to an increased amount of stress levels and burnout rates. Homework also takes away from valuable time that could be spent participating in extracurricular activities or spending time with loved ones.

Stress levels among students have been on the rise due to the increasing amounts of homework assigned by teachers. Students are expected to balance their academic life with their personal life, leading to an overwhelming sense of pressure. As a result, students may experience anxiety or depression due to being overworked.

The negative effects of homework can take a toll on a student’s mental health, leading them down a path towards burnout. Burnout rates have been linked directly to excessive amounts of homework given by teachers. When students feel overwhelmed by their workload, they may begin to feel unmotivated and uninterested in learning altogether.

This is counterproductive since the purpose of completing homework is meant to reinforce what was learned during class hours. When students become burnt out from too much school work, it can negatively impact their grades and future educational opportunities.

In conclusion, while there are some benefits associated with completing homework regularly, such as better grades or retention rates- it’s important not to overlook the potential harm it can cause students mentally and emotionally. It’s crucial that educators consider both sides when weighing up whether assigning additional work outside of school hours is necessary or not.

Ultimately, we need more effective ways for students to learn that won’t lead them towards burnout or high-stress levels but rather foster growth and enthusiasm for acquiring knowledge long-term!

The Debate Over Homework

You may be wondering whether or not assigning homework is truly beneficial for students. The debate over homework has been ongoing, with some arguing that it helps reinforce concepts taught in class while others claim it can lead to added stress and burnout.

However, research findings have shown mixed results regarding the effects of homework on academic achievement. While there is evidence to suggest that completing homework can improve grades, other studies indicate that too much homework can have a negative impact on student well-being and academic success. This raises questions about the necessity of assigning excessive amounts of work outside of school hours.

Additionally, parental involvement in ensuring their child completes their homework can also play a role in its effectiveness.

Ultimately, the debate over homework continues as educators try to strike a balance between reinforcing classroom learning and allowing students to maintain a healthy work-life balance. As research findings continue to emerge and parents voice their concerns, the conversation surrounding this topic will likely persist for years to come.

Finding a Balance

As you strive to find a balance between homework and other responsibilities, it’s important to set realistic goals for yourself.

Creating a supportive environment can also help you stay focused and motivated.

Additionally, encouraging good time management habits can make all the difference in maintaining a healthy work-life balance.

Setting Realistic Goals

By setting realistic goals for you as a student, we can help you avoid the overwhelming stress and frustration that often comes with homework assignments. Here’s how:

  • Start small: Break down larger assignments into smaller, more manageable tasks.
  • Prioritize: Determine which tasks are most important or urgent and focus on those first.
  • Take breaks: Allow yourself time to rest and recharge in between tasks to prevent burnout.
  • Celebrate progress: Acknowledge your accomplishments along the way to keep yourself motivated.

Measuring your progress and assigning individualized tasks is important, but it’s equally crucial to set achievable goals that won’t leave you feeling defeated before you even begin.

Remember to take care of yourself throughout the process, and don’t forget to celebrate each step towards success!

Creating a Supportive Environment

Creating a supportive environment can transform your study experience from mundane to magnificent, turning your academic pursuits into an exhilarating journey of growth and discovery.

One way to achieve this is through parental involvement. Parents play a vital role in creating a supportive environment for their children’s study habits. They can offer motivation, help with homework, create schedules and routines, and provide necessary resources to ensure their child’s success. When parents are involved in their child’s education, they show that they care about their child’s future and encourage them to take ownership of their learning.

Another essential aspect of creating a supportive environment is teacher communication. Teachers are not just responsible for imparting knowledge but also nurturing students’ development holistically. Therefore, it’s crucial to maintain open communication channels between teachers and students or parents by facilitating regular feedback sessions or progress reports.

This helps track progress while identifying areas needing improvement while keeping everyone informed about the student’s performance and any potential issues they may face academically or otherwise. With such support systems in place, students feel more confident about tackling challenges head-on and taking control of their academic journeys with pride and resilience.

Encouraging Time Management

Encouraging effective time management is crucial for students to take control of their academic journeys and achieve success. One way to support this is by encouraging them to track their time.

This means creating a schedule or using a planner to allocate specific times for studying, completing assignments, and engaging in other activities. By tracking their time, students will be able to identify areas where they are spending too much or too little time and adjust accordingly.

Another way to encourage effective time management is by finding an accountability partner. This can be someone who shares similar academic goals or interests and who can help keep you on track with your tasks.

Accountability partners can check in regularly with each other, celebrate successes, and offer support when challenges arise. Having someone else hold you accountable can help you stay motivated and focused on achieving your goals, which ultimately leads to better academic outcomes.

Alternative Approaches

If you’re tired of the traditional homework approach, there are alternatives to consider.

Project-Based Learning allows for hands-on experience and a deeper understanding of concepts.

Flipped Classroom puts the responsibility of learning on the student, with teachers acting as facilitators.

No Homework Policies can relieve stress and allow for more family time, but may not adequately prepare students for exams.

Adjusting the paragraph structure in the input can make it easier to read and understand. It’s also a good idea to use contractions to make the text more conversational.

Project-Based Learning

Project-Based Learning offers a refreshing approach to education that prioritizes hands-on experiences and practical skills over traditional homework assignments.

Instead of assigning endless worksheets and readings, project-based learning encourages students to work collaboratively on real-world problems that require critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

By engaging in practical applications of concepts learned in class, students are able to develop a deeper understanding of the material and retain it better than through rote memorization.

Collaborative assignments in project-based learning also promote teamwork and communication skills, which are essential for success in any field.

Students learn how to work with others towards a common goal, while also being held accountable for their individual contributions.

This type of learning environment fosters creativity and innovation, as students are encouraged to think outside the box and come up with unique solutions to complex problems.

Overall, project-based learning provides a more engaging and meaningful way for students to learn that goes beyond the limitations of traditional homework assignments.

Flipped Classroom

You’re going to love how the Flipped Classroom approach allows you to learn at your own pace and gives you more time for interactive activities during class. In this teaching method, you’ll watch video lectures or read materials at home before coming to class.

This way, the teacher can use classroom time to discuss topics in-depth and engage students in group projects, debates, or experiments.

One of the advantages of the Flipped Classroom is that it promotes active learning. Instead of passively listening to lectures or taking notes, you get involved in discussions and problem-solving activities that challenge your critical thinking skills. Moreover, because you review the material beforehand, you can ask questions in class and clarify concepts that might be unclear.

However, there are also challenges with this approach. For example, if you don’t have access to technology at home or struggle with self-discipline, it may be hard for you to keep up with the workload or participate effectively in group work. Also, some teachers may not provide enough guidance on how to use online resources or fail to adjust their teaching style based on students’ needs and feedback.

No Homework Policies

Schools that’ve implemented no homework policies are seeing positive results, but some may argue that this approach doesn’t adequately prepare students for college or the workforce. However, these policies may be beneficial for a number of reasons.

Firstly, no homework policies can lead to increased student engagement in schoolwork. Without the stress and pressure of completing daily assignments at home, students can focus on their classroom learning and participate more actively in class discussions and activities. This increased engagement can lead to better academic performance overall.

Additionally, eliminating homework can increase parental involvement in their child’s education. Parents are often tasked with helping their children complete homework assignments, which can be time-consuming and stressful for both parties involved. By removing this burden from parents’ shoulders, they may be more inclined to engage in other aspects of their child’s education such as attending parent-teacher conferences or volunteering in the classroom.

To summarize, while there may be concerns about how a lack of homework could impact college readiness or workforce preparation, no homework policies can have several benefits such as increasing student engagement and parental involvement.

Pros and Cons of Each Approach

Get ready to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of each approach in teaching and learning. When it comes to homework policies, there are two main approaches: traditional homework assignments which require students to complete work at home, and no homework policies which prioritize class time for student learning. Each approach has its own set of pros and cons.

Traditional homework can provide students with additional practice opportunities outside of class. It allows them to review content covered in class without feeling rushed or pressured by time constraints. Additionally, some teachers use homework as a way to introduce new material before it is covered in class, which can help prepare students for upcoming lessons.

On the other hand, traditional homework can be overwhelming for some students who may not have enough support at home or struggle with time management skills.

No homework policies prioritize group work and independent study during class time. This approach allows for more collaboration among peers and gives teachers the opportunity to provide immediate feedback on student work. However, this method may not be suitable for all types of learners as some may prefer working independently or need more structure to succeed academically.

Overall, both approaches have their strengths and weaknesses, and it’s important for educators to consider what works best for their individual classrooms and students’ needs.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do different cultural backgrounds impact the effectiveness of homework.

If you come from a multicultural background, you may be wondering how parental involvement and teacher expectations affect your success with homework.

Research has shown that both factors play a crucial role in determining how well students perform on their assignments. For example, parents who are actively involved in their child’s education tend to see better results than those who are less engaged.

Additionally, teachers who set high expectations for their students often motivate them to work harder and achieve more. However, these factors can vary depending on the cultural context in which they are implemented, so it’s important to consider how your own background may impact your experience with homework.

What is the impact of homework on mental health and well-being?

Homework can be a real drag sometimes, can’t it? It can feel like an endless stream of assignments and deadlines that you never get a break from. But did you know that the impact of homework goes beyond just academic achievement?

It also has a significant effect on your mental health and well-being. The constant pressure to complete homework can drain your motivation and leave you feeling overwhelmed. And while parents play an important role in supporting their children’s education, they can unintentionally add to the stress by pushing too hard or not providing enough guidance.

So next time you’re struggling with yet another assignment, remember that it’s not just about getting good grades – it’s about prioritizing your mental health too.

What is the correlation between homework and academic achievement?

If you’re wondering whether homework actually helps with academic achievement, there are a few factors to consider.

One of the biggest is parental involvement – studies have shown that students whose parents are actively involved in their homework tend to perform better academically.

On the other hand, technology can be both a blessing and a curse when it comes to completing homework. While it can provide useful resources and tools for research, it can also be a major distraction for students who struggle with staying focused.

Ultimately, the correlation between homework and academic achievement may depend on individual circumstances and habits, but these two factors are certainly worth keeping in mind.

How does the amount of homework assigned vary between different grade levels?

Are you curious about how the amount of homework assigned changes as you move up grade levels? Well, brace yourself for some interesting grade level discrepancies.

In elementary school, teachers typically assign around 10 minutes of homework per night per grade level. As students advance to middle school, that number can jump to 90 minutes or more! High school students may be expected to complete up to three hours of homework each night.

Of course, these are just generalizations; teacher expectations and individual schools may vary. But one thing is certain: the amount of time spent on homework increa

Is there a difference in the effectiveness of homework for different subjects?

When it comes to subject-specific homework, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach.

Different subjects may require different formats of homework assignments, and what works for one subject may not work for another.

For example, math homework may involve problem-solving exercises, while English homework may require reading a novel or writing an essay.

Therefore, it’s important for teachers to consider the diversity of homework formats when assigning tasks to their students.

By tailoring the assignments to specific subjects and considering the best format for each assignment, students are more likely to engage with the material and benefit from completing their homework.

So, now that you’ve weighed the pros and cons of homework, it’s time to come to a conclusion.

On one hand, homework can help reinforce learning and teach valuable skills such as time management and responsibility.

On the other hand, it can cause stress and take away from important family and social time.

The debate over homework will likely continue for years to come. However, what’s important is finding a balance that works for both students and teachers.

Perhaps alternative approaches such as project-based learning or flipped classrooms could be explored. Whatever the solution may be, it’s clear that homework should not be overwhelming or detrimental to a student’s well-being.

So let’s strive for balance and effective learning practices – after all, isn’t that what education is all about?

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First Grader's English Homework Has Internet Baffled: 'We Are At A Loss'

A first-grade child's English homework has left both her parents and the internet as a whole completely baffled.

The importance of homework remains a source of debate among parents, pupils and academics alike . In 2017, a study conducted by researchers from the University of Tübingen in Germany found that doing homework assignments was of huge benefit to children.

They found kids who did their homework diligently were more conscientious than their peers and generally worked harder at school.

However, in a survey of 782 U.S. parents conducted by Narbis, a technology company focused on products designed to enhance concentration, over 80 percent of respondents said their child had struggled to complete homework assignments.

A first grader's English homework.

Little wonder then that Justin, from Knoxville, Tennessee, turned to social media for help in completing his daughter's English comprehension homework.

Posting a picture of the assignment to Reddit under the handle u/Alternative-Watch759, Justin wrote: "Help. We are at a loss."

The "Magical e" worksheet asked kids to "say the word, add an e and write the new word. Draw a picture of the new word."

It all seemed simple enough until Justin took a look at the sheet and the various pictures of items those completing the task were expected to come up with single-word meanings for. They would then become new words with the addition of an "e" on the end.

They included a dripping tap, a first aid kit, a hopping bunny, some kind of rug, a teddy bear and a can of tomatoes. The sheet can be seen below:

"We thought it was funny the things we were coming up with," he told Newsweek . "I posted a picture of it to social media to see what Reddit came up with. My daughter came up with the answer 'cane' which was pretty solid."

The homework sparked a glut of responses and earned over 15,000 upvotes. "After trying to work this out, I find that after all these years from first grade, at age 65, I'm still dumb as a brick," one user wrote. A second admitted: "The only one I got is mat+e = mate? But even then I'm doubting myself."

A third, meanwhile, came up with their own unique list of answers: "Spigote, First Aide, Bunnye, Carpete, Teddy Beare, Tomato Soupe."

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Elsewhere, one user wondered: "Is this a worksheet from a different country? England or something?" While another Redditor had their own theory: "I'm guessing, where it's a first grade class ...that it's partly to see what words the kids come up with for the images, and how they can function by adding an E to it.

"To me, it seems like a bit much for a first grade, so I don't suspect the teacher is expecting perfection, just see what results the kids (and maybe their parents) can come up with."

Thankfully someone was able to come up with something that appeared about as close as anyone was going to get to the right answer:

Tap ...Tape Kit.., Kite Hop... Hope Mat... Mate Cub... Cube Can... Cane

"I feel weird doing the homework of a 6 year old , but I guess if it helps," the user who came up with the answers wrote, before adding: "You're on your own for drawing them."

Uncommon Knowledge

Newsweek is committed to challenging conventional wisdom and finding connections in the search for common ground.

About the writer

Jack Beresford is a Newsweek Senior Internet Culture & Trends Reporter, based in London, UK. His focus is reporting on trending topics on the Internet, he covers viral stories from around the world on social media. Jack joined Newsweek in 2021 and previously worked at The Irish Post, Loaded, Den of Geek and FourFourTwo. He is a graduate of Manchester University. Languages: English.

You can get in touch with Jack by emailing [email protected]

To read how Newsweek uses AI as a newsroom tool, Click here.

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  1. Advantages and Disadvantages of homework for Kids

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  2. Should Homework Be Banned in Schools

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  3. Should Schools Eliminate Homework?

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  4. Pros and Cons of Homework Infographic

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  5. Pros And Cons Of Doing Homework

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  6. Top 17 reason Why Homework Should Be Banned

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  1. No homework finally

  2. 3 Reasons Why NOBODY Likes HOMEWORK!!!!!

COMMENTS

  1. College Homework Help Services Online

    With current subjects, with unknown teachers, with new classrooms it's stressful enough for young people to be focused. That's why students choose homework help discord, a place to discuss all difficulties online and solve problems. With guidance and support of experts it's easier to understand unknown topics and work on self-improvement.

  2. Homework Pros and Cons

    Research published in the High School Journal indicated that students who spent between 31 and 90 minutes each day on homework "scored about 40 points higher on the SAT-Mathematics subtest than their peers, who reported spending no time on homework each day, on average." [ 6]

  3. The Pros and Cons: Should Students Have Homework?

    1. Homework Encourages Practice Many people believe that one of the positive effects of homework is that it encourages the discipline of practice. While it may be time consuming and boring compared to other activities, repetition is needed to get better at skills.

  4. 20 Pros and Cons of Homework

    Here are some of the key pros and cons to discuss. List of the Pros of Homework 1. It encourages the discipline of practice. Repeating the same problems over and over can be boring and difficult, but it also reinforces the practice of discipline. To get better at a skill, repetition is often necessary. You get better with each repetition.

  5. Is homework a necessary evil?

    Weir, K. (2016, March 1). Is homework a necessary evil? Monitor on Psychology, 47 (3). https://www.apa.org/monitor/2016/03/homework Homework battles have raged for decades. For as long as kids have been whining about doing their homework, parents and education reformers have complained that homework's benefits are dubious.

  6. The Pros & Cons of Homework Bans

    Cons of Homework Bans 1. Homework Fosters Study Skills and Independent Learning Proponents of keeping homework in schools say that the practice is about more than just reviewing academic...

  7. Why Homework is Bad: Stress and Consequences

    Health News Is Too Much Homework Bad for Kids' Health? Research shows that some students regularly receive higher amounts of homework than experts recommend, which may cause stress and negative...

  8. 18 Advantages and Disadvantages of Homework Should Be Banned

    1. Homework creates a longer day for students than what parents work. There are times when parents need to bring work home with them after a long day of productivity, but this time is usually part of a compensation package. Students do not receive the same luxury.

  9. Pro and Con: Homework

    CON Too much homework can be harmful. Homework disadvantages low-income students. There is a lack of evidence that homework helps younger children. This article was published on February 25, 2022, at Britannica's ProCon.org, a nonpartisan issue-information source.

  10. 9+ Pros And Cons Of Homework You Must Know (2023)

    Pros of Homework. Homework Encourages Practice. Homework Gets Parents Involved. Homework Teaches Time Management. Homework Opens A Bridge Of Communication. It Provides More Learning Process. Cons Of Homework. Eliminate Children Benefit From Playing. No Evidence Of Improvements By Homework.

  11. Are You Down With or Done With Homework?

    Some schools and districts have adapted time limits rather than nix homework completely, with the 10-minute per grade rule being the standard — 10 minutes a night for first-graders, 30 minutes for third-graders, and so on. (This remedy, however, is often met with mixed results since not all students work at the same pace.)

  12. Stanford research shows pitfalls of homework

    A Stanford researcher found that students in high-achieving communities who spend too much time on homework experience more stress, physical health problems, a lack of balance and even alienation from society. More than two hours of homework a night may be counterproductive, according to the study. By Clifton B. Parker

  13. Should We Get Rid of Homework?

    Oct. 26, 2022 Do you like doing homework? Do you think it has benefited you educationally? Has homework ever helped you practice a difficult skill — in math, for example — until you mastered...

  14. The Pros and Cons of Homework

    Con 1: Too Much Homework Can Negatively Affect Students You'll often hear from students that they're stressed out by schoolwork. Stress becomes even more apparent as students get into higher grade levels.

  15. Is Homework Necessary? Education Inequity and Its Impact on Students

    "Their findings were troubling: Research showed that excessive homework is associated with high stress levels, physical health problems and lack of balance in children's lives; 56% of the students in the study cited homework as a primary stressor in their lives," according to the CNN story.

  16. Pros and Cons of Homework

    What Students Think Homework has become a point of significant stress for American students. One Stanford study found that 56% of students who participated in the survey stated that homework was a primary source of stress. Another study found that the decline in adequate teenage sleep may be partly due to homework.

  17. 27 Top Homework Pros and Cons (2023)

    1. Homework teaches discipline and habit Discipline and habit are two soft skills that children need to develop so they can succeed in life. Regular daily homework is a simple way that discipline and habit are reinforced. Teachers can talk to students about what they do when they get home from school.

  18. 15 Should Homework Be Banned Pros and Cons

    There are some disadvantages which some families may encounter as well. These are the updated lists of the pros and cons of banning homework to review. List of the Pros of Banning Homework 1. Giving homework to students does not always improve their academic outcomes.

  19. Pros and Cons of No Homework 2023

    Have you ever wondered what life would be like without it? Well, wonder no more! In this article, we will explore the pros and cons of no homework. From improved academic performance to reduced stress levels, you'll discover the potential benefits and drawbacks of this controversial topic.

  20. Should Kids Get Homework?

    (Getty Images) How much homework students should get has long been a source of debate among parents and educators. In recent years, some districts have even implemented no-homework policies,...

  21. Major 10 Reasons Why Students Should Not Have Homework

    First, it can lead to stress and burnout, overwhelming students with too much work. Second, it can take away time that kids need for other important things like family time, sports, or just relaxing. Additionally, it might not always be useful, as some homework tasks might not help students learn better.

  22. The Great Homework Debate {Homework vs. No Homework}

    Cons to "No Homework". Possibly unprepared for middle/high school. Less parent engagement in school work. Less cultivation of study habits. Chance of less-rounded education overall. Indeterminate research on the issue. How many of you have seen research on this great homework debate, and what are your thoughts?

  23. 20 Pros and Cons of Homework 2023

    Prepares for Future Lessons: Some homework assignments introduce new concepts that will be discussed in upcoming lessons. This gives students a head start, allowing them to grasp the concepts faster when they are formally introduced. Encourages Lifelong Learning: By cultivating the habit of studying outside of classroom hours, students are more likely to continue seeking knowledge throughout ...

  24. First Grader's English Homework Has Internet Baffled: 'We ...

    A first grader's English homework. Despite being aimed at young kids, the comprehension exercise had many adults stumped. u/Alternative-Watch-759 Little wonder then that Justin, from Knoxville ...