How to Write a Business Plan for Daycare and Preschool

  • brightwheel
  • Running a business

People sitting at a table reviewing business graphs

Writing a daycare or preschool business plan is a big task, but due diligence and hard work will help you understand what you’ll need to launch and run a daycare or preschool successfully.

people sitting around a table reviewing a business graph

What do daycare investors want?

Your local government will have rules and regulations you’ll need to follow as a small business owner and childcare provider. Start by reviewing the childcare licensing guidelines for your state and city. Once you’re clear on licensing guidelines, you’re ready to start writing your childcare business plan.

The purpose of a business plan is to help secure funding. You’ll likely need financing to launch your preschool or daycare, especially if you want to avoid the monthly repayment of a loan. 

Investors provide businesses with money in exchange for partial ownership. As a result, they expect a larger return on their initial investment. Because many investors work in business, they prefer to invest in an established company.

Most investors look for:

Industry background and experience

Financial performance and promise.

Investors want to make money. Therefore, they are more inclined to work with experienced entrepreneurs and business owners to guarantee a return on their investment. 

This might sound discouraging for those with little experience or without a business management background, but the opportunity doesn’t end there. You could consider bringing on a partner with a business background. Additionally, many investors act as a source of business advice. 

You need to demonstrate that your business will make money. Investors will likely want to see signs of business growth before they give you money. 

Additionally, investors will want to know about your financial stability. Questions an investor might ask are:

  • What do you plan to do with the money?
  • Has your business been up or down in recent years?
  • Is your company losing money? Are there signs of growth for the future?
  • How do you plan to repay your investment?

Of course, every investor is different, so they’ll consider various factors. While experience and financial promise are at the top of the list for most investors, they might also look for uniqueness, business readiness, an effective business model, and more.

A women using a calculating and holding cash

Writing a daycare business plan

We’ve discussed licensing and investors. Now, you’re ready to begin the framework of your business plan for daycares and preschools. Here’s what you’ll need to get started:

Business description

Needs assessment, insurance policies, operating policies and procedures, marketing strategy.

Start with the basics: what does your daycare do? Detailing the service you’re offering will help you create a clear business plan. Next, you might want to write some goals or even a mission statement outlining your purpose and motivation.

Start by looking at general daycare or preschool industry trends, then narrow your scope to the preschools or daycares in your local area. Next, you’ll need to figure out who your target customers are and confirm that there is a need for a business like yours in your community. 

Are there a lot of young families in your neighborhood? Are you located somewhere convenient for commuting parents? Does your business offer a specific service that your competitors don’t, like early check-in or extended hours? 

Also, check out the competition. Research the existing daycare or preschool options in your community. Look at current preschool or daycare business plan samples. What makes your daycare or preschool unique? 

Developing detailed budgets will help you run your small business. You’ll need to compare your current cash flow and expenditures to determine whether you’ll make a profit.

Build a budget for unexpected costs. For example, how many children do you need to serve to be able to pay your bills and stay afloat? Child Care Aware of America offers some terrific budgeting resources for this process.

Depending on the type and size of your preschool, you’ll need insurance policies of several different types, including liability, property, workers’ compensation, and business insurance. Check the licensing requirements for guidance in building this part of your preschool business plan.

Create a comprehensive handbook for families and staff that includes you center's policies and procedures. For instance, you'll need to develop an emergency plan , daycare sick policy , and other safety protocols according to your local childcare licensing requirements. 

Your staff handbook will be a helpful resource your employees can reference and include all your employment policies including work and pay schedules, benefits, and information about professional growth and development. You can also include information on your center's philosophy and curriculum, classroom procedures, and expectations for working with children and families.

Your marketing strategy is the key to attracting customers. Decide what type of advertising you will use in front of potential customers. For example, list your school in local directories and participate in parenting and kid-friendly community events. Run a social media campaign focusing on your target population.

Another big part of childcare business marketing is differentiating yourself from other preschools. These days adopting daycare software is a surefire way to attract families with young children. A tool like brightwheel's center management feature will streamline your center's admission process, record keeping, and reporting, saving you up to 20 hours per month. 

You can also use brightwheel for recording and tracking daily events and activities, and sending real-time updates to families throughout the day. It also offers secure, digital check-in/check-out and a paperless billing system. This is a great way to keep your families looped in on daily activities and handle all of your administrative tasks in one place.

Your business is ready!

Writing a business plan can be stressful, but it doesn’t have to be. Once you secure the proper licensing, use the information in this article to guide you through creating a solid daycare business plan that drives investors and financing to your business.

These are just the basics to get you started. For further information, the U.S. Small Business Administration’s website has detailed instructions on creating each necessary part of a successful business plan. 

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Daycare Business Plan Template

Written by Dave Lavinsky

Business Plan Outline

  • Daycare Business Plan Home
  • 1. Executive Summary
  • 2. Company Overview
  • 3. Industry Analysis
  • 4. Customer Analysis
  • 5. Competitive Analysis
  • 6. Marketing Plan
  • 7. Operations Plan
  • 8. Management Team
  • 9. Financial Plan

Daycare Business Plan

You’ve come to the right place to easily complete your daycare business plan.

We have helped over 100,000 entrepreneurs and business owners create business plans and many have used them to start or grow their daycares.

How To Write a Daycare Business Plan & Example

Below are links to each section of your daycare business plan template:

  • Executive Summary – This is a brief overview of your daycare business plan. The executive summary should be no more than 2 pages long, with brief summaries of other sections of the plan.
  • Company Overview – This is where you provide a business description, including your company history, business structure, and any pertinent information about the daycare center.
  • Industry Analysis – The industry analysis describes the daycare industry, including market size and trends.
  • Customer Analysis – This section of your daycare business plan describes your target market and potential customers. You will detail the demographics, needs, and wants of your target audience and how you plan to meet those needs.
  • Competitive Analysis – The competition in your local area will be described here, along with how your daycare business will compete in the market.
  • Marketing Plan – Your marketing plan will describe your daycare’s marketing strategy, including your advertising and promotion plans.
  • Operations Plan – This section of your business plan describes how your daycare will be operated on a day-to-day basis. It may also include your long-term plans for expansion and the milestones you want to achieve to get there.
  • Management Team – The management team section of your business plan should describe the experience and qualifications of your management team including the director, teachers, and support staff.
  • Financial Plan – The financial plan section of your daycare business plan should include your financial statements, such as your income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement.

Next Section: Executive Summary >

Daycare Business Plan FAQs

What is a daycare business plan.

A daycare business plan is a plan to start and/or grow your daycare business. Among other things, a good daycare business plan will outline your business concept, identify your target customers, present research about the child care industry, detail your marketing plan, and provide your financial plan.

You can  easily complete your daycare business plan using our Daycare Business Plan Template here .

What Are the Main Types of Daycare Businesses?

There are different types of daycare businesses that parents can choose from for their child's needs. A traditional daycare center is most sought after by working parents since it provides child care during regular work hours. There are also in-home daycare centers that are licensed to provide child care in a home setting with fewer children. Other child care centers provide hourly care services by trusted babysitters or nannies and are operating on an as-needed basis.

What Are the Main Sources of Revenues and Expenses for a Daycare Business?

The primary source of revenue for a daycare business is its child care services.

Some key expenses for a daycare business is rent, salaries for staff, utilities and snacks expenses for the children.

How Do You Get Funding for Your Day Care Business Plan?

A daycare or child care center is typically funded through small business loans, personal savings, credit card financing and/or angel investors. This is true for a business plan for daycare or a childcare business plan.

What are the Steps To Start a Daycare Business?

Starting a daycare can be an exciting endeavor. Having a clear roadmap of the steps to start a business will help you stay focused on your goals and get started faster.

1. Develop A Day Care Business Plan - The first step in starting a business is to create a detailed child care business plan that outlines all aspects of the venture. This should include market research on the childcare industry and potential target market size, information on the services you will offer, marketing strategy, pricing strategies and detailed financial projections.

2. Choose Your Legal Structure - It's important to select an appropriate legal entity for your daycare business. This could be a limited liability company (LLC), corporation, partnership, or sole proprietorship. Each type has its own benefits and drawbacks so it’s important to do research and choose wisely so that your daycare business is in compliance with local laws.

3. Register Your Daycare Business - Once you have chosen a legal structure, the next step is to register your daycare business with the government or state where you’re operating from. This includes obtaining licenses and permits as required by federal, state, and local laws. 

4. Identify Financing Options - It’s likely that you’ll need some capital to start your daycare business, so take some time to identify what financing options are available such as bank loans, investor funding, grants, or crowdfunding platforms. 

5. Choose a Location - Whether you plan on operating out of a physical location or not, you should always have an idea of where you’ll be based should it become necessary in the future as well as what kind of space would be suitable for your operations. 

6. Hire Employees - There are several ways to find qualified employees including job boards like LinkedIn or Indeed as well as hiring agencies if needed – depending on what type of employees you need it might also be more effective to reach out directly through networking events. 

7. Acquire Necessary Daycare Equipment & Supplies - In order to start your chlidcare business, you'll need to purchase all of the necessary equipment and supplies to run a successful operation. 

8. Market & Promote Your Business - Once you have all the necessary pieces in place, it’s time to start promoting and marketing your childcare   business. This includes creating a website, utilizing social media platforms like Facebook or Twitter, and having an effective Search Engine Optimization (SEO) strategy. You should also consider traditional marketing techniques such as radio or print advertising to reach your target audience.

Learn more about how to start a successful daycare business:

  • How to Start a Daycare Business

Where Can I Get a Daycare Business Plan Example PDF?

You can download our daycare business plan PDF template here. This is a business plan template you can use in PDF format.

The Daycare Business Plan Blueprint (Examples + Template)

daycare business plans

April 14, 2022

Adam Hoeksema

Starting a daycare business can be a daunting task. There are so many things to think about and plan for. You need to find the perfect location, get the right licenses and permits, hire qualified staff, and, most importantly, create a daycare business plan. 

Creating a daycare business plan is one of the most important steps in starting your business. A well-thought-out business plan will help you get funding, attract investors, and operate your business effectively. 

The bad news is that there is a lot of advice out there on writing a business plan. With so much information and tons of daycare business plan examples to choose from, it can be overwhelming to know where to start. 

The good news is, we've got you covered. In this article, we'll give you a comprehensive guide on how to write a daycare business plan. We will also provide some examples and a free daycare business plan template to get you started. 

But First...Is a Daycare a Good Business to Start? 

Before we talk about how to create a daycare business plan, let's first answer the question: is starting a daycare a good business to get into? 

The answer is a resounding yes! The daycare industry is growing rapidly. It is one of the few businesses that are not only recession-proof but also thrives in uncertain economic times. 

According to the National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies (NACCRRA), the demand for child care services has increased by 26% over the last decade. This demand is only expected to grow in the coming years. 

When it comes to profitability, the daycare industry is very attractive. According to IBISWorld , the average profit margin for a daycare business is around 15%. That's higher than the average for most other industries! 

If you're thinking about starting a daycare business, know that you are getting into a very profitable and in-demand industry. Now let's talk about how to write a daycare business plan that will help you start and grow your business successfully.

How to Create a Daycare Business Plan 

A daycare business plan is as simple as a word document with the following sections:

  • Business Description
  • Market Analysis

Business Model

  • Location and Facility
  • Marketing Plan
  • Financial Plan

Executive Summary

This article will provide context of what to include in each section of your daycare business plan. As you work on writing your business plan, you will want to grab our daycare financial projection template as well in order to complete the financial plan section.

Your daycare business plan should be an elevator pitch in itself. It should be attractive to potential partners and investors. Basically, it should give them a clear idea of your business, where it is located, what services you offer, who your target market is, and how you plan to make money. 

Creating a daycare business plan doesn't have to be complicated. In fact, the cheapest and easiest approach is to simply start with a blank word document and work through each of the above sections, it can be pretty easy. Here is a step-by-step guide on how to create a daycare business plan: 

Create a Compelling Business Description

Your daycare business's unique selling point (USP) should be the first thing you include in your business plan. What is it that makes your daycare center different from all the others? 

This description should be the foundation of your marketing efforts as well.

There are a few questions you should answer in your company description. They include:

What's your Curriculum Based On?

Potential investors, partners, and even customers will be interested in knowing what your curriculum is based on. This will help them understand the environment children will be in a while under your care. 

When describing your curriculum, make sure to include:

  • What age ranges do you cater for?
  • The type of care you offer (full-time, part-time, drop-in) 
  • Your educational philosophy 
  • The activities and programs you offer 

For example, if your daycare is unique by offering a Montessori curriculum, you will want to highlight that.  In fact, you can learn more about how to start a Montessori program here . 

How Big is Your Facility? 

The size of your facility will say a lot about the type of operation you're running. Are you a small, home-based daycare or a large center with multiple classrooms? 

This section of your business plan may include: 

  • A floor plan of your facility 
  • The capacity of your facility 
  • The number of employees you have 
  • Type of equipment and furniture you have 

Who Is Your Target Market? 

You can't market to everyone, so you must identify your target market. This will help you focus your marketing efforts and ensure that you're reaching the right people. 

Below is a daycare business plan example that shows how your business description should be:

“ABC Daycare is a small, home-based daycare located in San Francisco, CA. We cater to children aged 0-12 years old and offer full-time, part-time, and drop-in care. 
Our curriculum is based on the Reggio Emilia approach, emphasizing hands-on learning and collaboration. Activities and programs include arts and crafts, music, and outdoor play. 
Our facility can accommodate up to 12 children at a time. We have a staff of four employees who are all CPR and First Aid certified. 
Our target market is working parents in the city who need quality child care but can't afford the rates of larger daycare centers.  We've created an affordable subscription-based pricing model for our target market to fulfill the demand. We generate revenue through monthly subscriptions and have low operating costs due to our small size. 
Our suppliers are local businesses that provide us with food, toys, and other supplies.” 

Do a Thorough Market Analysis

After writing a compelling description of your business, you need to do a thorough marketing analysis. This analysis will help you determine your target market, what type of advertising and promotion will work best, and how to price your services. 

You should also research the competition and see what they are doing right and wrong. This information will be invaluable as you create your daycare business plan.

Keep these things in mind when doing a market analysis:

The Size of Your Market

This is determined by the number of potential customers in your area who need or want your services. 

For example, if you live in a small town with only a few thousand people, there may not be enough demand to support a large daycare facility. 

On the other hand, if you live in a city with hundreds of thousands of people, there may be room for multiple daycare facilities. 

Your target market is the segment of the population that is most likely to use your services. This includes factors like age, income, education, and location. 

After you've identified your target market, you need to show how you plan on fulfilling the demand. This is where your business model comes in. 

Your business model is a detailed description of how your daycare will operate daily. It should include: 

  • How do you plan on acquiring customers? 
  • What are your pricing strategies? 
  • How will you generate revenue? 
  • What are your operating costs? 
  • Who are your suppliers? 

Your business model should be detailed and easy to understand. It should also be realistic and achievable. 

Here is a daycare business plan example of a business model for a small daycare center: 

“The daycare will be open Monday through Friday from six in the morning to six at night. We will offer care for children ages six weeks to twelve years old. 
Our rates will be $50 per week for one child and $40 per week for each additional child from the same family. We will offer a discount of $20 per week for families who enroll their children for an entire year. 
We will generate revenue by charging weekly rates for our services. Our operating costs will include rent, utilities, supplies, and salaries for our employees. Also, we will acquire customers through online advertising and word-of-mouth.” 

As you can see, a business model is a detailed description of how your business will operate. It's essential to have one in place before promoting and selling your services. 

One thing you should not forget to include in your daycare business plan is the location of your business and your rental agreement. If you are renting a space, including the terms of your agreement and how long you have the space. If you are purchasing a property, include information on the property, such as square footage and any special features that will help your business stand out. 

This daycare business plan example shows you how to include this vital information: 

“The daycare will be located at 123 Main Street in a commercial space currently leased by the owner. The lease agreement is for three years with an option to renew for an additional three years. The monthly rent is $2000, and the security deposit is $3000. 
The daycare will have exclusive use of the main floor, including a large open play area, a small kitchen, two bathrooms, and four classrooms. The daycare will also have access to the outdoor playground.
80% of our space will be used for childcare, with the other 20% used for our administrative offices and staff lounge. 
We have chosen this location because it is close to several residential neighborhoods and has easy access to public transportation. The space is also large enough to accommodate our future growth.” 

There are many daycare business plan templates you can use to help you get started. This is a basic outline of what should be included.

Daycare Marketing Plan

Most daycare business plan templates will include a section for your marketing plan. Most people overlook the marketing aspect of their business, but it is one of the most important pieces of your puzzle. 

In your business plan, you need to outline your target market, your marketing strategies, and how you plan on executing those strategies. 

You also need to set aside a budget for your marketing efforts. Many people make the mistake of thinking that they don't need to spend money on marketing, but that couldn't be further from the truth. 

The following daycare business plan example shows you how you should describe your marketing efforts:

"Our target market is working for families with children between six weeks and five years old. We will reach our target market through online and offline marketing efforts. 
Some of the offline marketing strategies we will use include print advertising, flyers, and word-of-mouth referrals. We will use a mix of SEO, content marketing, and social media for online marketing. 
We have set aside a budget of $500 per month for our marketing efforts."

As you can see from the example above, your marketing plan should be clear, concise, and to the point. Don't forget to include a budget!

Daycare Financial Plan

Your business plan should include a financial plan section. This is where you'll lay out how much money you need to start or grow your business. Be specific and include dollar amounts. If you're seeking a loan, including information on how much you're requesting and how you'll use the funds.

You should also include a detailed budget in your business plan. Your budget should include all of your projected income and expenses for at least the first year of operation. Creating a budget will help you get a clear picture of what it will cost to start and operate your business.

This section should include projected costs for:

  • Rent or mortgage payments
  • Advertising and marketing
  • Operating expenses such as utilities, supplies, and more. 

Startup costs are another vital item to include in your business plan. This is the money you need to purchase equipment, furniture, or any other items to get your business up and running.

If you plan to secure a loan, your lender will want to see a detailed business plan with information on how you plan to use the loan funds. Ensure you include this information in your business plan to increase your chances of securing funding.

If you're seeking funding from investors, you'll need to include information on how they will be compensated. This is typically done through equity, a percentage ownership stake in your business. 

For example, if you seek $100,000 in funding and offer a 20% equity stake, the investor will own 20% of your business. 

Make sure you use a daycare business plan template that includes a section on funding to ensure you include all the necessary information. If you’re planning to get a loan or seek investment, you’re going to need full financial projections. Our daycare financial model will provide up to 5 years of projected income statements, cash flow and balance sheet forecasts.

Next I want to answer some key financial questions for you as you consider how to forecast your daycare financials. I am going to hit on:

  • Daycare Startup Costs
  • Daycare Revenue 
  • Daycare Facility Operating Expenses
  • Daycare Profitability

Let’s dive into some key questions. 

How much does it cost to start a daycare? 

It costs between $10,000 and $50,000 to start an in-home daycare business according to Bizfluent . 

It costs between $59,000 and $3 million dollars to start a daycare facility according to Bizfluent . 

So obviously this is a huge range in startup costs.  The main thing that will determine your startup costs is your daycare facility.  Depending on how large your daycare is, whether you are buying, building, or leasing the space, and how much renovation needs to be done, your startup costs can vary drastically.  

Some tips to help you estimate a cost of a daycare facility:

  • A daycare facility should have 35 square feet of open floor space indoors per child. 
  • So if you wanted a facility that could care for 100 children you would need 3,500 square feet of indoor space for children, plus additional space for offices, kitchen, bathrooms, etc.  Let’s assume that you would need at least 5,000 square feet of space for a daycare facility that served 100 children.  
  • A daycare center would cost at least $295 per square foot to construct in the U.S. based on data from Levelset . 
  • Constructing a new 5,000 square foot daycare center would likely cost at least $1,475,000 based on $295 per square foot.  
  • Now you might not be constructing new, rather you might rent an existing facility which could require renovations.  You will need to get a specific quote for the specific renovations that you need for your space. 

How much revenue can a daycare business make?

A daycare facility can generate $17,680 in revenue per year per child according to Zippia .  

A daycare business with 100 children can generate over $1.75 million per year in annual revenue based on our average revenue per child of $17,680. 

How much does daycare cost?

The average cost of daycare is $17,680 per year, per child in the U.S. according to Zippia . 

This means that the average monthly cost of daycare in the U.S. is roughly $1,475.

What is the typical child to staff ratio for a daycare? 

The typical child to staff ratios for a daycare are:

  • 1 adult staff for every 4 infants (age 0 to 12 months)
  • 1 adult staff for every 6 toddlers (age 1 to 3 years)
  • 1 adult staff for every 10 pre schoolers (age 3 to 5 years)
  • 1 adult staff for every 12 school aged children (5+ years old)

Source - Childcare.gov

These ratios will help you estimate how many staff members you will need.  Our financial projection template makes this easy.  Just enter in your ratios and the number of children you expect to have in each age group and the model will automatically calculate the number of staff required to maintain your ratios.  See the input daycare staffing table below:

daycare business plans

What are the typical operating costs for a daycare? 

Your largest operating expense for a daycare facility is likely to be your rent. 

It should cost between $20 and $30 per square foot to rent a daycare center space based on available spaces on Loopnet . 

Other operating costs for a daycare center include:

You can see how you can enter in your operating costs into our financial model below:

daycare business plans

How much profit can a daycare make? 

The average daycare profit margin is 6.5% according to Daycare Business Boss . 

Once you complete your projections you will want to take a look at our At a Glance tab to make sure that your projected profit margins aren’t way out of line with the industry norms.  You can find projected profit margins for your daycare below:

daycare business plans

This is an important aspect that you may not find in most daycare business plan templates, but it's still essential. An appendix includes any additional information to help you understand your business plan. This might include things like your:

  • Business licenses 
  • Insurance policy 
  • Lease agreement 
  • Sample contracts 
  • Staff bios 

This section adds credibility to your daycare business plan and shows that you've done your homework. Including all of the necessary details in your appendix will give investors peace of mind and show that you're serious about starting a daycare center.

An executive summary is a brief overview of your business plan and is often considered the most important section. It should be two pages long, with a clear description of your business, your goals, and why you will achieve them.

There are several key elements to include in your executive summary:

  • Business Name: This is the name you have chosen for your business.
  • Location: Include the city, state, and country where your business will be located.
  • Business description: Describe what type of business you will be operating.
  • Target market : This is the group of people you will be targeting as customers.
  • Competition: Who are your competitors, and how will you compete with them?
  • Product or service : What product or service will you be offering?
  • Sales and marketing: How will you generate sales?
  • Financials: Include a five-year income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement.
  • Management team: Introduce your management team and their experience.
  • Exit strategy : This is the plan for how you will eventually sell or otherwise exit the business in case you decide to retire or move on to other projects.

The executive summary is the most crucial section of your business plan because it gives investors and lenders a quick overview of your company and its prospects. Be sure to include all of the key elements listed above, and keep it under two pages in length.

What Are The Benefits of Creating a Daycare Business Plan?

Research shows that a business plan helps business owners make better decisions, turn abstract goals into tangible objectives, and track progress over time. But what does this mean for those who want to open a daycare? 

Creating a business plan forces you to think through every step of starting your company. It's a valuable exercise that can save you time and money in the long run. Even if you don't end up following your business plan to a tee, the process of writing it will help you better understand your business and what needs to be done to make it successful. 

There are many benefits to creating a daycare business plan, including: 

Gives You a Roadmap to Follow

As with any journey, it's always helpful to have a map. A business plan is that map for your daycare business. It will give you a clear idea of where you want to go and how you can get there. 

Helps You Secure Funding

A business plan is essential if you're looking for investors or loans. It will show potential lenders and investors that you've put thought into your business and have a solid strategy for making it successful. 

Ensures Your Daycare Business is Feasible

When you're starting a business, it's easy to get caught up in the excitement and overlook potential problems. A business plan forces you to take a step back and assess whether your business is truly viable. It also helps you identify any areas where additional research is needed. 

Final Thoughts

A daycare business plan is a valuable tool to help you make your business successful. 

It is worth noting that your business plan is not a one-time exercise but should be updated regularly as your business grows and changes. This document is meant to be a living document that evolves as your business does. 

If you're unsure where to start, there are plenty of resources available to help you, including daycare business plan examples online, books, and daycare business plan templates. 

You can also use our daycare projection template to get your financial plan ironed out and ready for your business plan.

The most important thing is just to get started. The sooner you create your business plan, the better prepared you will be for success.

You can get the Daycare Facility financial projection template here!

The template is simple to use and will save you loads of time while still producing professional looking daycare projections. ProjectionHub has helped more than 50,000 businesses create financial projections so you can be confident that you can do it too.

The daycare business projection template includes:

5 Year Daycare Facility Pro Forma Financial Statements

CPA Developed & Completely Customizable

Free Support & Projections Review

Compatible with Google Sheets

Free expert review of your completed projections

The template is easy to use and you do not need to be an excel wizard to fill it out. Editable cells are highlighted in blue, a video guide is included, and our team is available to answer any questions you have.

You can see the complete walkthrough and demonstration of the daycare business forecast template here:

Get the template today for just $79

daycare business plans

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How to Start a Day Care: A Step-by-Step Guide

Caroline Goldstein

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If you’re a teacher, former teacher, or simply have years of experience caring for children — and an entrepreneurial streak — you might have considered starting your own day care center, either from home or in a dedicated facility. And at an expected job growth of 7% over the next decade, working in child care is a stable career choice. So, if you’re seriously wondering how to start a day care center, you’ve come to the right place.

As is the case starting a business in any industry, however, your passion for your craft alone — or, in this case, your students — isn’t quite enough to ensure that your day care business is copacetic, either financially or legally. You’ll need to do a good amount of due diligence when looking into how to start a day care business, paying special attention to licensing requirements, and ensuring that your facility and program aligns with your state’s health and safety codes.

If you’re a pro at educating, training, supporting and generally corralling large groups of small children, you should be pretty unperturbed by the work it takes to start a day care business. Here’s what you need to know.

daycare business plans

How to start a day care business

Although every path toward starting a business looks different for every business owner, there are a few steps that every aspiring day care owner needs to think about when it comes to how to best start a day care.

1. Decide what kind of day care business you want to start

Before you can even get to writing a business plan for your day care business, you need to decide what kind you want to open. Look into whether you want to start a day care business at home, or whether you want a more commercial facility — there might be different permits required in your municipality depending on which you choose. You also need to decide what age groups you want to focus on.

Next up, you'll have to decide on a business entity, which will have huge effects on the way you're taxed and how you operate your day care business. Will you have partners or open your business on your own? Additionally, you'll want to consider whether you want a business entity that offers you some protection. Making your day care center a limited liability company might be a good move, since the business will take on liability should anything go wrong.

You might also decide to buy into a day care franchise opportunity. This option will significantly streamline the steps you need to take in opening your day care.

Once you narrow down these details about your business, you can move on to the next step in starting a day care business: writing a business plan.

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2. Write a day care business plan

This is a step you have to take when starting any business and it can be quite a bit of work, especially for anyone looking to get moving quickly on their business. When you start writing a business plan, start with an outline of all the things you want to include.

Your plan should include a summary, an overview of the company, a market analysis that includes an assessment of the need for a business like yours, a marketing and sales plan, and a financial plan along with financial projections. Don't worry, though, you can always add to it as your business grows.

One thing you should include, though, is market research. The last thing you want to do is go through all of these "how to start a day care business" steps, only to find that there isn't a market for one or that there are already too many day cares in that area to make it a viable business.

Your business plan should also include a budget. The costs associated with opening and running your day care center can never be accurately totaled, but nailing down a budget will give you some parameters to work within (and some peace of mind).

In your budget plan, don’t forget to factor in:

Your startup costs, including day care equipment, food, toys and educational tools, wages, insurance and licensing.

How much tuition you’ll charge.

Your predicted revenue over the next two to three years.

When you’ll break even.

Also know that day care centers can claim certain tax deductions, which can ease your annual financial burden.

You'll also want to include a marketing plan. If you’re seriously researching how to start a day care business, it’s likely that you’ve already been caring for children in your area for some time and have built up a network of local parents. That’s one valuable method of attracting customers (aka word of mouth) covered. Still, implementing even a basic marketing plan can help define and legitimize your business — and if you need to implement a waitlist as a result, that’s great too!

Your marketing efforts can be relatively simple and low-cost. You can start by creating a Facebook page for your day care center and building a business website, making sure to include your contact information and a little bit about your business. If possible, plan to include pictures of your facilities and testimonials from happy customers.

If you’re a fan of social media, it also can’t hurt to create an Instagram, LinkedIn and/or Twitter account to keep both current and prospective customers updated on your business. Just be sure that once you do, you receive permission from parents or guardians before posting pictures of their children, of course.

Analog marketing techniques would work well here, too. If possible, consider distributing flyers or brochures to nearby libraries, schools, places of worship or any other local gathering spots.

3. Obtain the necessary certification and licenses

You may not need a master’s degree in education to become a day care teacher, but each state does require some combination of licensing and certification when it comes to how to start a day care. Visit your state’s Division of Child Care Services (or its equivalent) to find out the training, experience and credentials you need to legally operate a day care facility.

In New York State, for instance, the head of the day care facility must have one of the following:

An associate degree in early childhood education or an equivalent.

A CDA credential (child development associate) and at least two years of experience caring for children.

A high school diploma and at least three years’ experience caring for children.

You'll probably find that there are some other requirements that usually come up when you're looking up how to start a day care business at home or in another facility. Your state may require that you and any staff you hire are CPR-certified, for one. Another point of safety to remember is that you should be trained in at least basic first aid for children. You and your staff might also need to be fingerprinted and undergo background checks before being cleared for work.

Even if your state doesn’t require that you obtain a license, you should consider doing so, as your licensing course will go over all the boxes you need to check to operate your day care in your state — including health and safety regulations, proper food preparation and the required child-to-adult ratio.

4. Find a (safe) day care facility

In certain states, in order to obtain the proper licenses or registration to start your day care business, you’ll first need to show that your day care facility meets your state’s health and safety requirements.

So whether you choose to open your day care facility in your own home, or buy or lease a new property, you’ll need to make sure your facility meets zoning, fire, and health and safety laws. When it comes to how to start a day care at home, you may need to make alterations to your house to comply with day care requirements in your state, so be sure to factor them into your budget.

5. Get insured

Another requirement for obtaining your license? Getting insured. In certain states, you’ll need to be licensed by the Department of Health and Human Services to run your day care center, but to do so, you’ll first need liability insurance.

The exception is home-based day care centers, which don’t need insurance to be licensed by the DHHS. Still, those opening day care centers at home should seriously consider obtaining small business insurance. You always run the risk of a lawsuit when you’re running your own business, but that risk increases when caring for other people’s children — so protect yourself whenever possible.

There are several types of insurance that cover day care businesses — general liability insurance, workers’ compensation, property insurance, abuse and molestation insurance and others — so contact an insurance broker to help you decide which coverage is best for your business.

6. Get a business checking account and credit card

Get a business credit card and a business checking account early on to help you keep your business expenses separate from your personal expenses when first starting a day care.

It’s crucial to separate your personal and business expenses for many reasons, not the least of which is to reduce your (or your accountant’s) burden come tax season. It’s simply the most professional way to conduct your business, too. Set yourself up for success now by signing up for a business credit card and opening a business bank account, and be diligent about using both solely for your day care’s finances.

Having a business credit card can help you increase your business credit score, too. By paying the card off on time — or early if you can — you can boost your score, which will help you late on when you need a loan or other financing for your day care business.

7. Get financing

Most entrepreneurs bootstrap their businesses at the beginning, as it’s difficult for brand-new businesses with limited credit history to secure a business loan, either from a bank or from an alternative lender.

Your financing options aren’t limited to your own purse strings (or your friends’ and family’s). Here are a few other ways to get funding and loans for a child care business:

SBA microloan

Although most SBA loans are available only to businesses with a few years of experience under their belts, SBA microloans are actually designed to help startups get off the ground. They’re especially accessible to women, veterans, minorities and business owners in low-income areas. And unlike most other SBA loan programs, SBA microloans are disbursed by nonprofit lenders, rather than banks.

As the name suggests, SBA microloans tend to be on the smaller side, with amounts capped at $50,000, but they may be as low as $500. (For more context, the average microloan amount was $14,000 in 2017.) And because microloans are designed for new businesses, business owners with average or even challenged credit may still be accepted, as long as other aspects of their SBA loan applications are in good shape.

SBA community advantage

These loans from the SBA have all of the advantages that come with SBA microloans but the community advantage loans are specifically for businesses that are serving traditionally underserved communities. These loans are generally for a higher dollar amount than the microloans and can go a bit further for your business.

Government grants

You might be able to obtain financial assistance to start and run your day care through state or federal funding programs for early childhood education providers. For instance, you can contact your state’s Child Care and Development Fund Plan to look into startup funds, or your state’s school meal contacts to seek funding for your day care center’s meals.

Take a look at the Administration for Children and Families Office of Child Care’s list for a more comprehensive overview of federal and state financing programs for child care centers .

Business credit card

It’s important to use a business credit card to keep your day care’s expenses separate from your own. Of course, using a credit card is also the most convenient way to pay for your daily expenses. And since credit limits for business credit cards tend to exceed those of consumer cards, you can spend more liberally without worrying about maxing out your card.

Another bonus? Using your business card responsibly (by which we mostly mean paying off your balance in full and on time, every month) can help you build business credit. And with a healthy business credit score, you’re in a better position to secure business loans with great terms down the line.

If you opt for a card with a long 0% intro APR period, you can essentially use that introductory grace period as an interest-free loan. Look into the American Express Blue Business Plus card, which, at 12 months, carries one of the longest interest-free introductory periods in a business credit card right now.

After your 12 interest-free months are up, though, a variable APR kicks in at a rate depending on your creditworthiness and the market. Check the issuer's terms and conditions for the latest APR information.

8. Hire staff

You may be planning on running your day care facility solo, but depending on your state and the number of children you’re looking after, that might not be an option — every state sets a required ratio of staff to children to ensure that every child receives adequate care. They also dictate the maximum number of children permitted in a group.

Adult-to-child ratios and class sizes depend on the age of the children, but they might also depend on the size of the day care facility, or face further restrictions based on municipality. For a day care center in New York state, for example, the state requires one adult for six children under school age. However, in New York City, there must be two teachers or one teacher and one assistant to every six children aged 2 to 3, with a maximum of 12 students allowed in a single group. Your own children may or may not be included in that count, too.

So, while hiring really depends upon your state’s requirements, it makes sense to leave room for hiring staff in your business budget. That way, you’ll be prepared for growth, without worrying about your operation shutting down because you’re not properly prepared for it. (Just keep in mind that any staff you hire needs to be appropriately licensed or trained for it, and potentially undergo a background check.)

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9. Write your day care contract and policies

To further legally protect your business, it’s crucial that you draw up a contract, write out your day care policies, and require that potential clients (or, more likely, the parents of potential clients) review and sign both documents before accepting their patronage.

If you're just starting to read up on how to start a day care business, you might not be clear on the distinction between these two documents. To clarify, your contract is the document stating that you’ll provide child care, be compensated for providing care according to the payment terms you specify, and have the right to terminate providing care.

Your policies, on the other hand, provide parents with important logistical information regarding how you’ll run your day care center. There, you can outline protocol regarding vacation, illness, inclement weather, drop-off and pickup times, curriculum, field trips, and anything else you believe is important for your clients to understand and agree to about your day care center.

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The ultimate guide to starting a daycare business.

The Ultimate Guide to Starting a Daycare Business

Why Start a Daycare?

Advantages to starting a daycare, can you start a daycare from home, how much does it cost to start a daycare, 15 steps to starting a daycare center, resources for daycare owners, bottom line.

Since most parents work outside the home, most preschool aged children receive some form of child care. While many are cared for by nannies, babysitters or other family members, nearly one-quarter (23.4%) of children under age five attend an organized daycare center. 

This presents a world of opportunity for those looking to take the next step and start a child care business of their own. Starting a daycare center can be both personally fulfilling and financially rewarding.

Do you want to open your own daycare center in the U.S.? Follow along with this guide as we reveal the step-by-step process for opening a successful child care business. 

Opening a daycare can be intimidating, but it can also be incredibly rewarding. While there is no blueprint for success, many child care business owners find joy in the journey. So whether it’s your passion for kids or desire to serve parents in your community, there are many valid reasons to open a daycare. 

What’s important is that you also need to consider your own unique reasons for wanting to open a daycare, as these reasons will then motivate you to follow through on your dream. Even though you will face obstacles along the way, the payoff of opening a daycare is certainly worth the struggles.

Fresh Starts Deserve FreshBooks

Starting your own daycare business can be advantageous on multiple levels. For one, you’ll have the personal satisfaction of starting your own care center from scratch. Then, there’s the joy of spending time with children and learning life-changing lessons along the way.

If you’re still on the fence about starting your own daycare, consider these likely advantages:

  • Emotionally rewarding: Working with kids teaches you to be patient and enjoy the simple things in life. You’ll also have the flexibility of having your own business versus being confined to a traditional day job.
  • Financial freedom: By opening a daycare, you’re in control of your income rather than reliant on a typical paycheck. You can maximize your earning potential and make investments back into your own business.
  • Personal child care: If you have your own child, you can care for them while you’re running your daycare. This will save you money and give your offspring opportunities to make friends with other kids. 
  • Continued education: Opening a daycare can open the door to new opportunities in the field of child care. You may be presented with another job position or choose to pursue additional education of your own accord. 
  • Extra money: Rather than stay home and care for your own children for free (assuming the original plan was to be a stay-at-home parent), why not make some extra money by caring for other children at the same time? 
  • Tax deductions: As a business owner, you can write of certain expenses as business expenses, saving you money on your taxes. These expenses can include a portion of your housing payment (if you have an in-home daycare), your cell phone bill, your vehicle, child care supplies and more. See Tax Deductions . 

These are just a few of the many advantages of starting your own daycare center. Now let’s address some common questions you may have about being a daycare business owner. 

Yes, starting a care center from your home is an option and may even be the more affordable option. This is because there are different options at the local, state and federal level that provide grants and funding to in-home daycare centers.

If you already have the space to run a child care business out of your home, it’s worth looking into Small Business Administration (SBA) loans to help you fund your endeavor. Remember, at the end of the day, you may be eligible for tax cuts and other benefits.

According to small business website bizfluent.com , the average startup cost for a daycare center is $10,000 to $50,000. This can vary widely depending on whether you’re opening a home-based daycare or leasing a separate facility for your care center. 

If you don’t have $10,000+ in your bank account, don’t worry. There are many grants and loans available to child care businesses. In fact, some local businesses will offer financial incentives to support budding child care centers. Consider reaching out to your community for support.

Now, let’s get to the good stuff: how to start your own daycare business from start to finish!

Starting a small business in general is always a journey. While we’ve outlined a few steps to getting your business up and running, know that there is no one “right” way to achieve success. You’ll learn many lessons along the way and are likely to pave your own path.

That said, here are 15 steps to starting your daycare center, even if you have zero experience.

1. Learn About Daycare Licensing Requirements

You might have started off as a babysitter or a nanny, but in order to start a full-on daycare business, you need to meet the proper licensing requirements in order to be legal . That way, your daycare will be legitimate and you won’t run into any legal trouble accepting children into your care. 

A good first step is to contact your state’s Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) to learn about their specific regulations for child care providers. Another option is your local area’s child care licensing agency. You can usually find this information online. 

To obtain a license to start a daycare center, you’ll also need a current CPR certification, a clean driving record and additional documents that prove your commitment to providing quality child care. Don’t be afraid to ask your local agency questions to ensure you’re satisfying all requirements.

2. Consider Taking Early Childhood Education Classes

While you don’t need to have professional child care experience to start a daycare business, having some understanding of early childhood development is strongly encouraged. You’ll be caring for young lives, so you need to know how to provide the right kind of support and care.

Getting a degree is early childhood education is a good place to start. You can typically find classes in-person at your local community college or online. Through this degree, you’ll gain a greater understanding of how children think and behave, and what they need in order to be properly cared for. 

Beyond that, you’ll have the skills to set your business apart from your competition. You’ll be better prepared to offer the services parents are looking for and keep them coming back time and time again.

3. Create a Daycare Business Plan

In starting any type of small business, it helps to have a business plan. Having a business plan helps you set tangible goals for your business, organize your business structure, outline your services and so much more.

In your daycare business plan, you’ll define your daycare’s mission statement, operations and procedures, staffing and budget. This business plan works to keep you on track and striving toward success. 

Consider how you want your business to be organized for you plan. Will you be solo or hire staff? How will you secure funding? Will you offer services beyond child care (like tutoring)? For help in creating your business plan, check out this detailed guide from the U.S. Small Business Association .

4. Find a Location for Your Daycare

If you plan on running your daycare out of your home, this step should be pretty straightforward. If not, you’ll need to find a location for your child care facility.

Many recreational centers, churches, local businesses and even schools have space available to host a daycare, typically for a monthly fee. Search online, in your local newspaper and within your network to find options in your area. 

Once you’ve found a good fit, you need to check your city’s zoning laws and licensing guidelines to make sure your chosen location is compliant. That way you can avoid some legal headaches down the road. 

Ideally, you’ll need to find a location that’s centrally located, easily accessible and child-friendly. Consider what children and their parents will be looking for in a child care center. You might not find the perfect option, but you can make it work with a little TLC.

5. Get Insurance

Most daycare centers need several types of insurance in order to keep children (and their businesses) protected. These policies typically include liability coverage, property, workers’ compensation and business insurance.

Not sure what type of insurance you need? You can always check with your local child care provider licensing office for guidance.

6. Seek Out Grants and Funding

As we covered already, there are certainly costs associated with starting a daycare. If you don’t have the money you need to cover your initial startup costs, you’ll need to get creative when it comes to acquiring funding.

There are many grants available to help you cover your startup costs. You might also consider taking out an SBA loan or doing community fundraising. Know that the goal is to use these funds as an investment that will yield profitable returns in your business.

Costs Associated with Starting a Daycare

There are several things you’ll need to buy or lease in order to get your business up and running for day one. These expenses include but are not limited to:

  • Renting a daycare space
  • Indoor and outdoor play equipment
  • Art supplies
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Child care supplies (like diapers and wipes)
  • Business laptop
  • Licensing fees
  • Food (for snacks/meals)
  • Bottles, cups, plates, utensils, etc.
  • Car or reliable transportation (optional)

You might think of some additional items you’d like to have at your daycare. Over time, you can use the revenue coming in to help cover these expenses and invest in better equipment/supplies. It’s OK to keep things simple and then scale your way up. 

7. Prepare Your Daycare Center

Once you have a location secured and the proper materials and equipment in place, it’s time to prepare your daycare center.

First, clean your facility and sanitize with an effective disinfectant. Then, take the needed steps to childproof your daycare according to the ages of the children you will be caring for. Follow this childproofing checklist for help.

Finally, set up play equipment and lay out toys. You might decide to use storage boxes to keep everything organized. You can always rearrange your layout according to your needs.

Is your daycare ready for service? Give it another once-over and you’re ready to open your doors for day one of business!

8. Draft up a Contract

As a small business owner, having a contract is always a good idea. The parents that come to your facility are essentially your clients, and you want to have a solid contract in place to protect yourself from any legal issues.

We recommend seeking out a trusted contract lawyer to draft up a contract according to your needs and unique business requirements. Your contract will then be used to outline your expectations for your clients and their children.

Here are some important questions to consider when creating your contract:

  • How do you expect to be paid?
  • How will you handle late payments?
  • What time should parents pick up their children?
  • Are there consequences for late pick up?
  • What services will you provide?
  • What is your policy when it comes to sick children?
  • Do you offer refunds? If so, under what conditions?
  • What happens if a child is injured at your facility?

Whether you seek help from an attorney or write the contract yourself, you should have a contract in place before accepting business. Once signed, you can then send professional daycare invoices to get paid by your clients. 

9. Establish Policies and Procedures

Establish policies and procedures for the families that attend your daycare and your staff. These procedures may include an emergency plan, safety procedures, privacy protocols and rules for your facility.

Having these procedures in place will help you keep the children safe and protect yourself from liability (in some instances). In establishing your policies, be sure to review your local child care licensing requirements to ensure compliance. 

10. Research Possible Tax Credits

If you’re opening an in-home daycare, you may be eligible for certain tax reductions based on the fact that you’re using your residence for business purposes. This means you can essentially write off a portion of your housing cost. This can be the case even if your daycare space serves as a family room after hours. 

11. Hire Staff as Needed

When you’re first getting started, you may just be a company of one, as you might want to save the cost of hiring unnecessary help. But over time, you may need to hire help to take care of the kids during the day.

This is especially true if you find yourself running up against the required ratio of staff to children, as outlined in your local daycare licensing requirements. Be sure to review these to make sure you have enough staff for the number of children you plan on caring for.

Also, make sure all child care staff undergo criminal background checks and provide references to ensure the safety of the children. Make your hiring decisions carefully to keep your facility safe and maintain a stellar reputation.

12. Market Your Daycare

You have your daycare set up and open for business, now how do you get families in the door? As with any small business, you’ll need to market yourself to attract potential clients.

There are many ways to market your daycare. One method is to create flyers and post them around your local community—at businesses, schools and coffee shops. You can also run paid ads on Google or Facebook to draw in families from your local area.

To establish your daycare as a professional business, consider building a website that provides more information about your services. A basic website can cost anywhere from $10 for a WordPress template and set up, to $2,000 or more for a custom design.

With a website, you can then use search engine optimization (SEO) to attract organic traffic from Google. That way, when families search for a daycare near them, your business is likely to show up in the search results.

13. Promote Your Daycare on Social Media

Another effective marketing tool for daycare centers is social media. Platforms like Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn can be used to promote your business and draw in potential clients.

Create a business Facebook page to post more information about your daycare, collect client testimonials and keep families up-to-date with events at your daycare. You can also post on Instagram and LinkedIn, with targeted hashtags, to attract families in your area.

As your business grows, you might decide to invest in paid marketing services. A digital marketing agency or consultant can help you increase your business’s presence online, outrank your local competitors and attract new clients. 

14. Provide Top-Quality Care

The success of your daycare depends on you providing top-quality care to your families. If the kids at your facility are properly cared for, and, even better, enjoy coming to your daycare, you’re likely to attract more referral business.

Positive reviews can work wonders to attract new clients. Ask families to review your business on Facebook, Google, Yelp and other review sites to improve your daycare’s reputation in your community.

Always look for ways to improve your daycare. Ask families for feedback, invest in additional education and hire fantastic staff to make your daycare the obvious choice for families in your area. 

Hit The Ground Sprinting

15. Manage Your Business Finances

Many small businesses fail due to poor money management. If you want your business to succeed, you’ll need at least a basic understanding of business accounting and how to manage your expenses.

Staying on top of your business finances is more than just tracking revenue in and expenses out. You’ll need to plan for taxes—typically around 30% of your revenue, after expenses—and make informed decisions when it comes to how you’re going to allocate your funds.

Professional daycare accounting software can help you send invoices, track revenue, manage expenses and more. It can even send reminders to parents for late payment and accept credit card payments with ease.

The more you know, the easier it will be to make smart financial decisions. Stay on top of your business finances so your business is not only surviving but thriving . 

Congratulations on taking the first step to starting your own daycare business—reading this guide! By now you have a general blueprint for how to start your own business and get up and running. 

Need more help getting started? Check out these reliable resources for aspiring daycare business owners:

  • Child Care Aware of America: licensing guidelines for child care and daycare providers
  • United States Department of Health and Human Services: childproofing checklist
  • Early Childhood Training and Technical Assistance System (ECTTAS): child care resource guide
  • Office of Child Care: list of state licensing agencies
  • Child Care Resources Inc.: early educator training

Starting a daycare business can be challenging but also incredibly rewarding. The process is made easier by having a general roadmap for how to get started. Hopefully, this guide has provided some guidance on how to get started, plus inspiration for you to finally launch a business of your own.

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  1. FREE Daycare Business Plan Template

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  2. Daycare Business Plan Sample

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  5. Family Daycare Business Marketing Plan

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  6. Daycare Business Plan Template in Word, Google Docs, Apple Pages

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VIDEO

  1. Starting a Daycare Business With 100k

  2. 5 Business Account Daycare Owners Should put in place

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Business Plan for Daycare and Preschool

    Your business is ready! Writing a business plan can be stressful, but it doesn’t have to be. Once you secure the proper licensing, use the information in this article to guide you through creating a solid daycare business plan that drives investors and financing to your business. These are just the basics to get you started.

  2. Daycare Business Plan Template (2024) - PlanBuildr

    How To Write a Daycare Business Plan & Example. Below are links to each section of your daycare business plan template: Executive Summary – This is a brief overview of your daycare business plan. The executive summary should be no more than 2 pages long, with brief summaries of other sections of the plan. Company Overview – This is where ...

  3. How to Write a Business Plan for a Daycare: Complete Guide

    In this article we go through, step-by-step, all the different sections you need in your daycare business plan. Use this template to create a complete, clear and solid business plan that get you funded. 1. Executive Summary. The executive summary of a business plan gives a sneak peek of the information about your business plan to lenders and/or ...

  4. The Daycare Business Plan Blueprint (Examples + Template)

    This daycare business plan example shows you how to include this vital information: “The daycare will be located at 123 Main Street in a commercial space currently leased by the owner. The lease agreement is for three years with an option to renew for an additional three years.

  5. How to Start a Day Care: A Step-by-Step Guide - NerdWallet

    9. Write your day care contract and policies. To further legally protect your business, it’s crucial that you draw up a contract, write out your day care policies, and require that potential ...

  6. The Ultimate Guide to Starting a Daycare Business

    Having a business plan helps you set tangible goals for your business, organize your business structure, outline your services and so much more. In your daycare business plan, you’ll define your daycare’s mission statement, operations and procedures, staffing and budget. This business plan works to keep you on track and striving toward success.